TWU Thesis Collection

Centered fuller communication : sensus plenior, relevance theory, and a balanced hermeneutic
Title:
Contributor:
Benjamin J. Wukasch (author), Steve Nicolle (thesis supervisor), Ken Radant (second reader), Allan Effa (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis will suggest a centered approach to biblical hermeneutics, proposing a balance in the function of the hemispheres of the human mind, left and right. It will examine how `ordinary readers' are doing hermeneutics both in Africa and the West, and join these contributions to the insights of scholars who use the historical-grammatical hermeneutic, and laypeople who use a personal-devotional hermeneutic. The insights of Gadamer will be employed on the topic of horizons of authors and readers. The interpretive practices of ordinary readers will be justified through the theological concept of sensus plenior. The communication that takes place through Scripture will be analyzed in the framework of a linguistic theory of communication, Relevance Theory, which will explain why ordinary readers interpret in a personal-devotional way. After proposing a balanced hermeneutic, constraints are proposed for its outworking, looking at the significance of this thesis for the church and Bible translation.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
The Greek perfect and the categorization of tense and aspect : toward a descriptive apparatus for operators in role and reference grammar
Title:
Contributor:
Michael Aubrey (author), Sean Allison (thesis supervisor), Steven Runge (second reader), Michael Boutin (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis expands the theoretical basis for operators within Role and Reference Grammar, using the Greek perfect as a test case. I examine current the approach to tense and aspect in RRG and its strengths and weaknesses. Some areas of RRG have a robust set of tools for language description, but semantic operators do not. I propose a model for tense and aspect operators that fills gaps in RRG while maintaining the integrity and spirit of the linguistic theory. I begin with a survey of the broader typological literature on tense and aspect to establish a set of tests for the evaluation and categorization of operators. I apply these tests to the Greek Perfect to evaluate their effectiveness, and concluding with a synthetic model for tense and aspect operators that satisfies the claims of the broader literature thereby furthering the goals of RRG as a framework for language description.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014