TWU Thesis Collection

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Associations between Relational Aspects of Care and Self-Reported Health Status of Residents Living in Long Term Residential Care Homes
Title:
Contributor:
Mary K DeLong (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Lena Cuthbertson (second reader), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Person-centred care acknowledges the person behind the patient and can enhance the quality of life of long term care residents. Relational aspects of health care are foundational to person-centred care; this study examines associations between relational aspects of care and residents’ self-reported mental and physical health. A secondary analysis of British Columbia Residential Care Survey data (N = 2,108) used hierarchical multivariate linear regression to evaluate the extent to which relational aspects of care explain variation in self-reported physical and mental health, relative to other care experiences. Relative improvement in relational aspects of care was associated with greater self-reported physical and mental health. For self-reported physical health, relational aspects accounted for 34.5% of the explained variance (R2 = 0.279), and for self-reported mental health, accounted for 48.3% of the explained variance (R2 = 0.274). Relational aspects of care do positively influence residents’ physical and mental health outcomes.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Avoiding Futility: How Nurses and Physicians Experience Emotions, Psychosocial Factors, and Their Professional Roles as Influencing the End-of-Life Decision Making Process
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Contributor:
Melissa J. De Boer (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Patricia Porterfield (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In this qualitative study, five nurses and four physicians from intensive care settings were interviewed about their experiences of the end-of-life (EOL) decision making process. For both professional groups, a shared mission to avoid futility was identified as foundational and climactic aim to the process. This desire heavily shaped initiation and engagement of what was presented as an ambiguous decision making process. Three themes emerged of elements that most influenced their variable experiences of the EOL decision making process: moral weightiness, family receptiveness, and the individual philosophy of approach. These findings emphasize the wide amount of subjective variability experienced and shed light on the competing emotional, psychological, and social interests for ICU nurses and physicians in the EOL decision making process. There must be greater understanding of the EOL decision making process in an intensive care context to provide better support to nurses and physicians.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Bullying from Staff Nurses : The Experience of Senior Undergraduate Nursing Students during Clinical Placements
Title:
Contributor:
Rachel M Froese (author), Landa Terblanche (thesis supervisor), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Maggie Theron (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The phenomenon of bullying within nursing is not new, and unfortunately nursing students are often victims. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perspectives of nursing students who have been bullied by staff nurses during a clinical experience. Participants from two western Canadian universities were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling using a series of emails and by a social media poster. Data collection involved one on one semi structured interviews with six senior undergraduate nursing students. Three main themes were identified: the student experience of bullying; the intervening influence of nursing educators; and the outcome of (in)security. Recommendations included education provided to students, clinical sites and clinical instructors; clinical setting guidelines for clinical instructors; policy implementation for reporting bullying and creating clinical groups; greater communication by institutional nursing leaders with staff and clinical instructors; and further research.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
Clinical Practice and Canadian Nursing Faculty: Keeping a Foot in Both Worlds
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Contributor:
Katelin J. Kavanagh (author), Darlaine Jantzen (thesis supervisor), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Shelly Canning (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Many benefits have been associated with nurse educator engagement in clinical practice (CP). However, nursing faculty CP has received minimal attention since the early 1990s and has rarely been discussed in Canada. Through interviews with twelve Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) faculty, this study used grounded theory to explore how Canadian BSN educators currently engage in CP. The core category identified was "Keeping a Foot in Both Worlds", which captures the tension that may be experienced by faculty who choose to engage as both clinical practitioners and teachers. Faculty in this dual role described themselves as uniquely positioned to integrate theory and practice and to connect the campus and clinical settings. This study also highlights the challenges BSN faculty face while maintaining a CP and underlines the positive impact this practice might have on teaching/learning. Recommendations include cultural and structural considerations for nurses in CP, education, and leadership.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2022
Clinical reasoning on an assignment : perceptions of third year Baccalaureate nursing students
Title:
Contributor:
Karen Oostra (author), Barbara Astle (thesis supervisor), Heather Meyerhoff (second reader), Em Pijl Zieber (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Baccalaureate nursing students must develop clinical reasoning skills in order to make sound clinical judgments. How students understand clinical reasoning is of interest to nurse educators. In a qualitative study, eight third-year nursing students were interviewed about their perceptions of clinical reasoning on a Clinical Judgment Exercise (CJE). An overarching theme of Over Time emerged from the data along with two themes: Understanding of Clinical Reasoning and Making Sense of the Assignment. The sub-themes that emerged were the same for each theme and were not knowing, knowing, applying knowing and valuing knowing. Conclusions were that student participants perceived: 1) understanding of clinical reasoning developed over time, 2) understanding of the patient’s problem deepened over the time of writing the assignment, 3) they were challenged by the complexity of the patient, 4) they were able to apply learning from the CJE to nursing practice and 5) writing the CJE was stressful.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Compassion fatigue and its association with workplace empowerment in acute care settings
Title:
Contributor:
Danielle Lisa Katherine Chatterton (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Angela Wolff (thesis supervisor), Landa Terblanche (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Compassion fatigue (CF) has been found to influence nursing care providers (NCP) in a variety of specialized areas; however, general medicine unit settings are often overlooked. A potential way to mitigate CF could be through the use of organizational empowerment structures. 117 nursing care providers (NCP) and health care attendants (HCAs) who provided direct patient care in the hospital medical unit context were surveyed using a cross-sectional survey design. Five units from four hospitals of a large, urban health authority in British Columbia participated. Findings revealed that 55% of the sample reported moderate to severe levels of CF. Accessibility to resources was the only organizational empowerment structure that explained variability in the sample's experience of CF (p < 0.01). In addition, the variance of CF was partially explained by the participants' highest level of education and marital status (p < 0.05). Further investigation is needed to further assess CF mitigation.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
A CONVERSATIONAL ANALYSIS OF COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSES AND SYSTEMS CHANGE IN FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITIES
Title:
Contributor:
Kathleen Lounsbury (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Evelyn Voyageur (second reader), Barbara Astle (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Community-based health services for Indigenous communities are undergoing considerable change in Northern and Western Canada. This study aimed to explore the status of community health nurses’ (CHNs) leadership knowledge, levels of change agency and the leadership implications in changing Indigenous nursing contexts, which reflect the different paradigms of First Nations Health Authority and Health Canada models of care. Six stories (three CHNs and three Stakeholders) were framed with the Conversational Method espoused by Kovach (2010). Each conversation was situated within the image of the two contrasting health model “trees” alongside corresponding analogies to issues identified by the participants. The use of ceremony as a deep way of inculcating lessons learnt is offered. My journey from a linear approach to data analysis to an Indigenous one is threaded throughout this thesis, and the leadership implications and possible alliances for the individual nurse, nursing education and nursing policy are presented.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2021
Discerning success of indigenous health students in community-based programs
Title:
Contributor:
Marti Harder (author), Barbara Astle (thesis supervisor), Sonya Grypma (second reader), Evelyn Voyageur (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Post-secondary educational institutions have partnered with Indigenous groups to provide community-based healthcare programs. In a qualitative study, eight participants from a northern British Columbia community were interviewed about their descriptions of success, and its influencing factors in a community-based healthcare program. The core theme of courage and categorical themes of nurturing the learning, owning the learning, and discerning success for learning emerged from the data, which revealed changes in students' lives as they moved through their schooling. Conclusions were: 1) Courage was needed to overcome fears and barriers during students' education; 2) Receiving nurturing through a whole-person approach promoted success; 3) Students' journeys were fostered through the support of others; 4) Students learning to believe in themselves was a key element of success; and 5) Collective community success was experienced when students were successful in a program. The importance of community voices may contribute towards planning future healthcare programs.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Experiences of women in early labour sent home following hospital assessment
Title:
Contributor:
Marilyn Morson (author), Landa Terblanche (thesis supervisor), Maggie Theron (second reader), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Labour and birth is a life event common to many women yet the physical process, in addition to psychological, social, and spiritual experiences, is unique to each woman. A woman under the care of a physician will come to a hospital when she believes she is in labour. If she is in active labour, the woman is admitted to hospital. If in early labour, the woman is often sent to walk within the hospital prior to reassessment as walking can contribute to progress in labour, or she is sent home. There is limited information about the phenomenon when a woman in early labour is sent home until she is admitted in active labour. Combining the elements of early labour and known possible psychosocial outcomes of birth, this qualitative study explored the experiences of women sent home in early labour within the context of one hospital site in Canada, having 4000 births annually. In-depth interviews with 10 postpartum women within 48 hours of birth yielded the data that were analyzed through a qualitative approach using interpretive description defined by Thorne, Reimer-Kirkham and MacDonald-Emes (1997), and using methods of analysis as outlined by Giorgi (2012). Themes resulting from this analysis were: Conflict between knowledge of labour symptoms and women’s initial responses; background influences and current pregnancy concerns; impact of the unspoken; experiences of pain and coping; and influence of others. Through literature integration it was concluded that all women experience an overwhelming anxiety that may empower/disempower their self-efficacy, confidence, communication with self/others and their coping. Suggestions for practice include a culture of open access to the assessment area and a focus on communication with women in early labour to better understand their individual needs and provide support to decrease anxiety and fear, increase confidence and foster empowerment.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Exploring How Family Members Experience Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD)
Title:
Contributor:
Kelly C H Schutt (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (second reader), Jennifer Gibson (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explored how family members experience Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD), since the 2016 Canadian legislation. The Listening Guide, a qualitative research methodology, was used to hear the experiences of seven family members from across Canada, whose loved one received MAiD. Analyses revealed that family members experienced tension in negotiating relationship to themselves, to their loved one, and to others involved. These tensions were heard in four voices throughout the study: witnessing, caregiving, honouring choice and supporting dignity, and surrendering and letting go. Current procedures and policies tend to focus on the individual receiving MAiD. Shifting practices to align with relational ethics could challenge healthcare providers to consider how they might support family members. By acknowledging the social context of the patient receiving MAiD, this study extends the discourse surrounding MAiD beyond the realm of individual autonomy, suggesting a shift in care from being patient-focused to being truly person-centred.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
Exploring the Experience of Mothers Who Have Children with Albinism in Tanzania: A Critical Ethnography
Title:
Contributor:
Emma B. Strobell (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Barbara J. Astle (second reader), Sonya Sharma (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Little is understood about the everyday lives of mothers of children with albinism in sub-Saharan Africa, specifically Tanzania. This region has a harrowing history of discrimination and violent attacks against persons with albinism, largely rooted in cultural/spiritual beliefs and practices, and perpetuated by layers of myth about albinism. A focused critical ethnographic study, through the lens of Hudson-Weems’ (2019) Africana Womanism, explored the experiences of mothers of children with albinism in Tanzania, addressed the gendered nature of this condition, and considered the human rights and resilience of the mothers. One participant’s story illuminated human rights and resilience from a mother’s standpoint, which was the backdrop for the presentation of findings that included stories of other mothers with albinism and the perspectives of key stakeholders. These findings highlight the social ecological nature of resilience for these mothers. Recommendations focus on policy, advocacy, and research related to health and social services and education.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
Exploring the Interprofessional Contributions of Spiritual Health Practitioners to Prevent Compassion Fatigue in Nurses
Title:
Contributor:
Amy R. Hildebrand (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Barry Quinn (second reader), Darlaine Jantzen (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The connections amidst compassion fatigue, the spiritual well-being of nurses, and the provision of support by spiritual health practitioners (SHPs) have not been well studied. The purpose of this qualitative thesis is to explore the perspectives of SHPs in their support for nurses to prevent compassion fatigue. This study was conducted using a qualitative interpretive description design. The methods utilized included a current literature review and thematic analysis of individual interviews with seven SHPs. A brief secondary analysis of data collected from a related research project informed the background and some findings of this study. One overarching theme, The Value of Connectedness, and three main themes were identified from the data: (De)Prioritization of the Spiritual in Health Care; SHPs’ Perception of Nurses’ Compassion Fatigue and Lack of Connection to Spirituality; and The Nature of SHP Support. Several conclusions and recommendations have been made from the completion of this research.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2021

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