TWU Thesis Collection

Incidental Correction of Pronunciation: Beliefs and Classroom Practice
Title:
Contributor:
Rebeka K. Delamorandiere (author), William Acton (thesis supervisor), Amanda Baker (second reader), Kay McAllister (third reader), Jennifer Foote (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Pronunciation instruction is currently being integrated into task-based English language education. However, instructors question the appropriateness of pronunciation correction, especially in a setting that focuses on meaning and content. Despite research suggesting successful techniques for correcting pronunciation, few studies explore the impact of correction in a class-based setting. In order to explore the appropriate locale for correction, this thesis describes observed instances of correction and then recounts student perspectives and instructor attitudes about correction in an academic setting. Observations show that instructors correct pronunciation errors by using primarily implicit recasts. Students desire pronunciation correction; however, they tend to be wary of interruption. Instructors believe that correction is necessary, but not if it will increase student stress and anxiety. Suggestions for effective implementation of feedback are given, including recommendations for when and how feedback could have occurred in the observed classes.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Pedagogical practice in mainstream university literature courses with generation 1.5 and international ESL participants
Title:
Contributor:
Nathan Kielstra (author), William Acton (thesis supervisor), Brian Teaman (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), James Stalker (external examiner)
Abstract:
The following mixed-methods study explored the pedagogical practices of mainstream instructors in literature classes with NNS participants at a university in British Columbia. The inclusion of NNS students in these courses presents challenges due to various educational differences as compared with NS peers. This often necessitates changes in the teaching practices of instructors who might have little experience or training in the instruction of NNS students. Participants included three instructors, 33 NS students and 17 NNS students. Results indicated that each instructor employed different types of instruction in their class, including practices implemented specifically for their NNS learners which appeared dependent on experience or the number of NNS participants. Learner perception of these practices varied, with international ESL, Generation 1.5, and NS students all exhibiting preferences unique to their groups. This suggests that university instructors are active in making pedagogical adjustments in classrooms inclusive of students with diverse language abilities.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2011
Teacher Cognition Related to Tabletop Game Use in Language Learning Classrooms
Title:
Contributor:
Daniel M. Jones (author), William R. Acton (thesis supervisor), Kay E. McAllister (second reader), Jonathan W. deHaan (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This research explores teacher cognition related to tabletop game (TTG) use in language learning classrooms. Games have been noted as having compatibility with teaching and learning principles (Sykes & Reinhardt, 2013). However, the broad principled use of TTGs is not evident (deHaan, 2019). The central concern of this study was the extent to which teacher cognition affects TTG utilization. The study explored how teacher cognition shapes materials implementation as well as ways to support teaching expertise. General teacher cognition was investigated through a quantitative questionnaire. Specialist teacher cognition was examined through qualitative interviews (six teachers). Responses were analyzed to identify emerging cognition patterns. The survey results from both groups were compared and contrasted. Patterns of teaching and cognition varied within and between both groups. Specialist teachers had significant markers of teaching ‘expertness’ related to using TTGs. Recommendations for increasing expertness (Borg, 2015) related to teaching with games are provided.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020