TWU Thesis Collection

Pages

Cinematic Childhood(s) and Imag(in)ing the Boy Jesus: Adaptations of Luke 2:41-52 in Late Twentieth-Century Film
Title:
Contributor:
James Magee (author), Dirk Büchner (thesis supervisor), Adele Reinhartz (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Despite sustained academic examinations of Jesus in film over the past couple of decades, as well as biblical scholars’ multidisciplinary work in the areas of children’s and childhood studies, the cinematic boy Jesus has received little attention. This thesis begins to fill the lacuna of scholarly explorations into cinematic portrayals of Jesus as a child by analyzing two adaptations of Luke’s story of the twelve-year-old Jesus in late twentieth-century film. Using methods of historical and narrative criticism tailored to the study of film, I situate the made-for-television movies Jesus of Nazareth (1977) and Jesus (2000) within the trajectories of both Jesus films and depictions of juvenile masculinity in cinema, as well as within their respective social, cultural and historical contexts. I demonstrate how these movie sequences are negotiations by their filmmakers between theological and historical concerns that reflect contemporary ideas about children and particular idealizations about boyhood.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
The citizen self and aboriginal “other” : notions of citizenship and aboriginality in British Columbian social studies education, 1945-present
Title:
Contributor:
Nicole Birkeland (author), Bruce Shelvey (thesis supervisor), Matthew Etherington (second reader), Jean Barman (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Social studies education in British Columbia from the 1940s until present has upheld active citizenship as a central objective of the program. While citizenship is never clearly defined, generally it has been assumed that through a process of self-actualization students come to know their rights and responsibilities as Canadian citizens. Problematically, these notions of citizenship have shaped the narration of Aboriginality within social studies education. Aboriginality has been represented in learning outcomes and resources materials within a progressive Canadian metanarrative, creating inaccurate and uninformed characterizations of Aboriginal peoples. Overall, social studies education has had a negative impact on the First Nations-Canadian relationship. However, social studies education could assist in developing more positive relationships. Engaging students in transformed historical study that fosters questioning, examines narrative choices, sees negotiation and interaction, recognizes and honours difference, and allows for dialogue, may foster more promising relationships in the future.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Clinical Practice and Canadian Nursing Faculty: Keeping a Foot in Both Worlds
Title:
Contributor:
Katelin J. Kavanagh (author), Darlaine Jantzen (thesis supervisor), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Shelly Canning (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Many benefits have been associated with nurse educator engagement in clinical practice (CP). However, nursing faculty CP has received minimal attention since the early 1990s and has rarely been discussed in Canada. Through interviews with twelve Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) faculty, this study used grounded theory to explore how Canadian BSN educators currently engage in CP. The core category identified was "Keeping a Foot in Both Worlds", which captures the tension that may be experienced by faculty who choose to engage as both clinical practitioners and teachers. Faculty in this dual role described themselves as uniquely positioned to integrate theory and practice and to connect the campus and clinical settings. This study also highlights the challenges BSN faculty face while maintaining a CP and underlines the positive impact this practice might have on teaching/learning. Recommendations include cultural and structural considerations for nurses in CP, education, and leadership.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2022
Clinical reasoning on an assignment : perceptions of third year Baccalaureate nursing students
Title:
Contributor:
Karen Oostra (author), Barbara Astle (thesis supervisor), Heather Meyerhoff (second reader), Em Pijl Zieber (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Baccalaureate nursing students must develop clinical reasoning skills in order to make sound clinical judgments. How students understand clinical reasoning is of interest to nurse educators. In a qualitative study, eight third-year nursing students were interviewed about their perceptions of clinical reasoning on a Clinical Judgment Exercise (CJE). An overarching theme of Over Time emerged from the data along with two themes: Understanding of Clinical Reasoning and Making Sense of the Assignment. The sub-themes that emerged were the same for each theme and were not knowing, knowing, applying knowing and valuing knowing. Conclusions were that student participants perceived: 1) understanding of clinical reasoning developed over time, 2) understanding of the patient’s problem deepened over the time of writing the assignment, 3) they were challenged by the complexity of the patient, 4) they were able to apply learning from the CJE to nursing practice and 5) writing the CJE was stressful.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Comparative tense and aspect in the Mara Bantu languages : towards a linguistic history
Title:
Contributor:
John B. Walker (author), Jamin Pelkey (thesis supervisor), Sean Allison (second reader), Oliver Stegen (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Through the elicitation of 91 Swahili sentences and the collection of one oral text, this research compares the TAM systems of several Mara Bantu languages (Tanzania/Kenya) with the aim of finding any shared "individual-­identifying" innovations (Nichols 1996) that can either affirm Mara as a coherent genetic linguistic sub-group (Schoenbrun 1990) or point toward a different historical scenario. A secondary goal is to provide a preliminary linguistic description of the TAM systems of five Mara languages: Ikizu (JE402, [ikz]), Ikoma (JE45, [ntk]), Kabwa (JE405, [cwa]), Simbiti (JE431, [ssc]), and Zanaki (JE44, [zak]). The research concludes that there is sufficient "individual-identifying" evidence from TAM systems to validate both a North Mara and a South Mara sub­group (Schoenbrun 1990). There is not, on the other hand, a sufficient base of shared "individual-­identifying" innovations to propose a unique proto-Mara TAM system uniting North Mara and South Mara at a post-proto-Great Lakes phase of development.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Compassion fatigue and its association with workplace empowerment in acute care settings
Title:
Contributor:
Danielle Lisa Katherine Chatterton (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Angela Wolff (thesis supervisor), Landa Terblanche (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Compassion fatigue (CF) has been found to influence nursing care providers (NCP) in a variety of specialized areas; however, general medicine unit settings are often overlooked. A potential way to mitigate CF could be through the use of organizational empowerment structures. 117 nursing care providers (NCP) and health care attendants (HCAs) who provided direct patient care in the hospital medical unit context were surveyed using a cross-sectional survey design. Five units from four hospitals of a large, urban health authority in British Columbia participated. Findings revealed that 55% of the sample reported moderate to severe levels of CF. Accessibility to resources was the only organizational empowerment structure that explained variability in the sample's experience of CF (p < 0.01). In addition, the variance of CF was partially explained by the participants' highest level of education and marital status (p < 0.05). Further investigation is needed to further assess CF mitigation.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Conceptualizing Historical Periodization in the Apocalypse : The Canonical Shaping of the Beast with Seven Heads and Ten Horns
Title:
Contributor:
Omele Burrell (author), Kent Clarke (thesis supervisor), Tony Cummins (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The academic study of the seven-headed sea beast symbolism in the Apocalypse has proceeded along contemporary historical lines since the modern period. This approach seeks to locate the meaning of this symbolic reference within the historical context from which the book derives. While it remains true that careful historical analysis has advanced our understanding of the world in which the seer of Patmos lived and wrote, a strictly contemporary historical focus threatens to confine the significance of this apocalyptic symbol to the environs of the first century. In seeking to recover the theological and contemporary relevance of this symbol as a critique of imperial ambitions, this thesis argues for a reading strategy which locates the Book of Revelation foremost in the context of "canon." Such a reading stance illuminates the meaning of the symbolic beast in relationship to the deep intertextual and theological history which the final book of the Bible shares with the canonical corpus of Christian Scriptures.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Connections and tensions among siblings in the presence of autism spectrum disorder : parental perceptions of the impact of the family system on sibling relationships
Title:
Contributor:
Kristy Dykshoorn (author), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor), Lily Dyson (second reader), Catherine Costigan (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The connections and tensions between siblings may impact the development and well-being that children with ASD and their typically developing (TD) siblings experience. Parenting style and parental stress are two factors that impact a caregiver's ability to effectively foster positive relationships. Finally, the interplay between sibling relationships, caregiver characteristics, sibling involvement in intervention, and success in ASD intervention is of interest. Primary caregivers (N = 108) completed an online questionnaire and a hierarchical multiple regression was conducted. Results indicated: 1) Parenting stress explains 12% of the variance found in the warmth and closeness of sibling relationships; 2) Sibling involvement and success in ASD intervention cumulatively contributes to 13.5% of the variance found in the warmth and closeness of sibling relationships; and 3) warmth and closeness uniquely explains 7% of the variance of success in ASD intervention. Limitations, practical implications, and future research direction will be discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Constructions and result: English phrasal verbs as analysed in construction grammar
Title:
Contributor:
Anna Olson (author), Emma Pavey (thesis supervisor), Sean Allison (second reader), David Weber (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis explores the difference between separable and non-separable transitive English phrasal verbs, focusing on finding a reason for the non-separable verbs’ lack of compatibility with the word order alternation which is present with the separable phrasal verbs. The analysis is formed from a synthesis of ideas based on the work of Bolinger (1971) and Gorlach (2004). A simplified version of Cognitive Construction Grammar is used to analyse and categorize the phrasal verb constructions. The results indicate that separable and non-separable transitive English phrasal verbs are similar but different constructions with specific syntactic reasons for the incompatibility of the word order alternation with the non-separable verbs.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
A CONVERSATIONAL ANALYSIS OF COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSES AND SYSTEMS CHANGE IN FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITIES
Title:
Contributor:
Kathleen Lounsbury (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Evelyn Voyageur (second reader), Barbara Astle (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Community-based health services for Indigenous communities are undergoing considerable change in Northern and Western Canada. This study aimed to explore the status of community health nurses’ (CHNs) leadership knowledge, levels of change agency and the leadership implications in changing Indigenous nursing contexts, which reflect the different paradigms of First Nations Health Authority and Health Canada models of care. Six stories (three CHNs and three Stakeholders) were framed with the Conversational Method espoused by Kovach (2010). Each conversation was situated within the image of the two contrasting health model “trees” alongside corresponding analogies to issues identified by the participants. The use of ceremony as a deep way of inculcating lessons learnt is offered. My journey from a linear approach to data analysis to an Indigenous one is threaded throughout this thesis, and the leadership implications and possible alliances for the individual nurse, nursing education and nursing policy are presented.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2021
A Critical Edition of Codex 0150 Including Its Textual and Reception History
Title:
Contributor:
Matthew J Hama (author), Kent D Clarke (thesis supervisor), Dirk L Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Codex 0150 is an unpublished New Testament manuscript that has received minimal scholarly attention since its discovery. This critical edition offers a conservative transcription of 0150 based upon high resolution digital images provided by the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (CSNTM). The transcription includes a comprehensive analysis of variants, which occur when 0150 is read against both the NA28 and the RP versions of the Greek New Testament. This edition critically engages background information of the manuscript such as date, provenance, and content, while also providing a close examination of scribal features present in 0150. Additionally, this work maximizes digital imaging technology to better understand the contents of the manuscript, its author, and the ancient world from which it arose. This edition provides access to an important piece within the New Testament manuscript tradition, and offers a rich foundation on which future scholarship can build.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Critical factors influencing paternal involvement : fathers’ experiences of negotiating role responsibilities
Title:
Contributor:
Marvin Bravo (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Richard Young (external examiner), Marvin McDonald (second reader)
Abstract:
This qualitative study uses the Enhanced Critical Incident Technique (ECIT) to explore incidents fathers report to be helpful or hindering to their parental engagement. Eight fathers were interviewed with 206 reported incidents. From the 206 incidents, 132 were identified as helpful (HE); 47 as hindering (HI); and 27 as wish list (WL) items. All incidents were assigned to one of the following categories (a) positive and negative role models, (b) Mother-Father Relationship (d) Father's Religion/Spirituality (e) Responsibility (f) Attachment (g) Personal Decision (h) Characteristics of Children (I) Reflective Parenting (j) Societal Influence (k) Father's Characteristics, and (l) Extended Family Influence. Fathers also provided 29 recommendations for effective paternal engagement. Research findings indicate major themes of responsibility, engagement, and father-mother dyad as important factors determining paternal involvement. Additionally, participants frequently referred to a confluence of factors impacting their involvement, which they navigate within a myriad of social roles.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013

Pages