TWU Thesis Collection

Pages

Constructions and result: English phrasal verbs as analysed in construction grammar
Title:
Contributor:
Anna Olson (author), Emma Pavey (thesis supervisor), Sean Allison (second reader), David Weber (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis explores the difference between separable and non-separable transitive English phrasal verbs, focusing on finding a reason for the non-separable verbs’ lack of compatibility with the word order alternation which is present with the separable phrasal verbs. The analysis is formed from a synthesis of ideas based on the work of Bolinger (1971) and Gorlach (2004). A simplified version of Cognitive Construction Grammar is used to analyse and categorize the phrasal verb constructions. The results indicate that separable and non-separable transitive English phrasal verbs are similar but different constructions with specific syntactic reasons for the incompatibility of the word order alternation with the non-separable verbs.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
A Critical Edition of Codex 0150 Including Its Textual and Reception History
Title:
Contributor:
Matthew J Hama (author), Kent D Clarke (thesis supervisor), Dirk L Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Codex 0150 is an unpublished New Testament manuscript that has received minimal scholarly attention since its discovery. This critical edition offers a conservative transcription of 0150 based upon high resolution digital images provided by the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (CSNTM). The transcription includes a comprehensive analysis of variants, which occur when 0150 is read against both the NA28 and the RP versions of the Greek New Testament. This edition critically engages background information of the manuscript such as date, provenance, and content, while also providing a close examination of scribal features present in 0150. Additionally, this work maximizes digital imaging technology to better understand the contents of the manuscript, its author, and the ancient world from which it arose. This edition provides access to an important piece within the New Testament manuscript tradition, and offers a rich foundation on which future scholarship can build.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Critical factors influencing paternal involvement : fathers’ experiences of negotiating role responsibilities
Title:
Contributor:
Marvin Bravo (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Richard Young (external examiner), Marvin McDonald (second reader)
Abstract:
This qualitative study uses the Enhanced Critical Incident Technique (ECIT) to explore incidents fathers report to be helpful or hindering to their parental engagement. Eight fathers were interviewed with 206 reported incidents. From the 206 incidents, 132 were identified as helpful (HE); 47 as hindering (HI); and 27 as wish list (WL) items. All incidents were assigned to one of the following categories (a) positive and negative role models, (b) Mother-Father Relationship (d) Father's Religion/Spirituality (e) Responsibility (f) Attachment (g) Personal Decision (h) Characteristics of Children (I) Reflective Parenting (j) Societal Influence (k) Father's Characteristics, and (l) Extended Family Influence. Fathers also provided 29 recommendations for effective paternal engagement. Research findings indicate major themes of responsibility, engagement, and father-mother dyad as important factors determining paternal involvement. Additionally, participants frequently referred to a confluence of factors impacting their involvement, which they navigate within a myriad of social roles.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Darwinian epistemology : assessing the implications for reliable cognition in a non-adaptive domain of belief
Title:
Contributor:
Andrew Brigham (author), Myron Penner (thesis supervisor), Phillip Wiebe (second reader), Helen De Cruz (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace departed ways on the implications of evolution for human cognition. While Darwin argued that natural selection affected both the reliability and unreliability of human cognitive faculties, Wallace rejected the idea that natural selection could explain higher order intelligence. If Wallace is right, then Darwinian epistemology seems implausible. However, I argue that this position is false. In Chapter 1 I survey a history of Darwinian epistemology. In Chapter 2 I examine the Scope Objection to Darwinian epistemology: that evolution did not supply us with the natural cognitive capacities for achieving non-adaptive true beliefs. In Chapter 3 I respond to the Scope Objection by assessing Robert McCauley’s theory of natural cognition. In Chapter 4 I evaluate two difficulties with my response to the Scope Objection. I conclude that evolution is sufficient for explaining the reliability of human cognitive faculties in non-adaptive domains of belief.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Death Ends a Life, Not a Relationship:  Family Bereavement, Relational Grieving, and Continuing Bonds
Title:
Contributor:
B. Tammy Bartel (author), Derrick W. Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Janice W. Nadeau (second reader), Lauren J. Breen (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explored the complex, multifaceted, relational dimensions of grieving in the family unit. Three bereaved families, who had lost a child participated in a family conversation and individual processing interviews. The guiding research question was, “how do bereaved families grieve together and continue a relationship with their deceased child?” Data were collected using the qualitative action-project method (QA-PM). This unique methodology offered a glimpse into how these families engaged with each other in their joint grieving actions. Data analysis was informed by action theory, family systems theory, and an instrumental case study approach. Family grieving processes were identified for each family and commonalities included turning towards their grief, sharing the pain, experiencing both joy and sorrow, participating in mourning events, ongoing rituals and remembrances, recognizing different individual grieving styles, and a shared, enduring connection to their deceased child that connected them to each other. The findings from this study demonstrate the importance of recognizing the interpersonal dimensions of the grieving process, and the family as a resource in this process.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
A Description of Pimbwe (Bantu, Tanzania) : Phonology, Grammar, and Discourse
Title:
Contributor:
Jonathan W Weiss (author), Steve Nicolle (thesis supervisor), Sean Allison (second reader), Lotta Aunio (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The present study is the first formal description of Pimbwe, a Bantu language (in the M.11 group) spoken in western Tanzania. After situating the Pimbwe language within the wider linguistic context, I describe Pimbwe phonology, tone, and grammar, with particular emphasis on the structure of the verb. Finally, natural language use in extended discourse is described based on two running commentaries of the Pear Story film.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
Disclosure of ASD Diagnosis and Peer's Social Response in Grade 3 to 7 Children
Title:
Contributor:
Jasmine (Tsing) Lee (author), Ken Pudlas (thesis supervisor), David Carter (second reader), Grace Iarocci (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Deficit in social communication skills is common to people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) which hinders their social interaction with others. Bolton and Ault (2018) suggested a positive correlation between Autism diagnosis disclosure and positive social response in college students and adults. The current study investigated if similar results can be observed from younger participants. Forty-three participants from grades three to seven participated in this study. The participants were asked to complete a questionnaire to ascertain their social responses toward a peer who demonstrates ASD traits with or without an ASD diagnosis disclosure. Also, information about participants’ gender, grade level and empathy scores were collected and analysed. The result showed that the group which was disclosed to an ASD designation demonstrated more prosocial responses and less asocial responses. Although the difference was not statistically significant, this initial study suggested the possibility of a positive effect of ASD diagnosis disclosure.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
Dividing to Connect: An Ethnography of Canal Zone Americans
Title:
Contributor:
Marilee R Brewer (author), Jamin R Pelkey (thesis supervisor), Edgar D Trick (second reader), Lori P Gardner (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis is a linguistic ethnography of the Americans who moved from the Panama Canal Zone to the U.S. when the Canal was sold to Panama. Theirs was a society of authoritarian socialism, lived beneath the Zone’s official motto: “The Land Divided, The World United.” Close-knit, but wary of outsiders, they called themselves “Zonians.” Using Thomas More’s Utopia as a gestalt for the utopian experience, this study compares the features of More’s Utopia with the Panama Canal Zone. In particular, it examines the utopian gesture of dividing from the old to connect to the new, arguing that the image-schematic metaphor of dividing in order to connect is constitutive of Zonian culture at multiple semiotic levels, from the physical transformation of the earth, to the social construction of group identity to everyday practices involving intercultural relations.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Educators' Perspectives of Youth-Led Implementation of the FRIENDS For Life Program: A Critical Incident Study
Title:
Contributor:
Nathan T Bartz (author), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor), Robert Lees (thesis supervisor), Annette Vogt (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study examined the viability of a newly piloted implementation model of the FRIENDS for Life anxiety prevention program. In Chilliwack, British Columbia, a collaborative community initiative piloted an implementation model of the FRIENDS for Life program, which involved the inclusion of high school students as chief implementers of the FRIENDS program to local elementary school populations. The purpose of the study was to answer the question of what helps and hinders the implementation of FRIENDS when high school students are the implementers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with five educators who were asked about their experiences with the FRIENDS program, what helpful and hindering incidents they observed, and to provide a wish list for future improvements. Results suggest that a youth-led FRIENDS implementation model is a viable model of program delivery and worth consideration for future development and refinement.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Embodiment of spirituality and sexuality : women’s lived experience of resilience to sexual shame
Title:
Contributor:
Kelsey Dawn Schmidt Siemens (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (second reader), Stephanie Martin (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Due to the prevalence of sexual shame among Christian women, this study was designed to better understand the lived experiences of sexual shame resilience and embodiment. Five young, married women were selected for inclusion based on their immersion in Christian culture during adolescence and for their experiences of working through sexual shame. In order to understand the meaning of these women’s experiences, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was employed. Through participant’s narratives, four categories of themes emerged (religious messaging around sexuality, experiences of sexual shame, healing experiences, and experiences of embodied sexuality). When participants were able to work through their sexual shame, they were able to embrace and find freedom in their sexuality. This study’s findings are consistent with Brown’s (2006) Shame Resilience Theory. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed in terms of the need to provide appropriate support for women struggling with sexual shame.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Employing Deuteronomy: an Analysis of the Quotations and Allusions to Deuteronomy in the Dead Sea Scrolls
Title:
Contributor:
Joshua M. Matson (author), Martin G. Abegg, Jr. (thesis supervisor), Andrew Perrin (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The study of quotations and allusions to the Hebrew Bible in religious texts has only recently began to be methodically approached and analyzed. Although previous studies on quotations and allusions to the Hebrew Bible in the Dead Sea Scrolls are amply available concerning individual manuscripts, no such study has sought to approach the subject from a perspective of universality. This study seeks to identify and analyze universal conclusions that have been obtained by a study of the quotations and allusions to Deuteronomy in all of the non-biblical Dead Sea Scrolls manuscripts. This is accomplished through an in-depth study of the history of studies on quotations and allusions in religious texts, a detailed explanation of the methodology utilized in this study, and an analysis of fifteen universal conclusions that are exhibited by the authors/scribes of the Dead Sea Scrolls when quoting or alluding to the Deuteronomy text of the Hebrew Bible.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
An Examination of the Underlying Moral Frameworks of Environmental Philosophy
Title:
Contributor:
Anna T Beresford (author), Myron A Penner (thesis supervisor), Grant Havers (second reader), Robert Doede (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In this paper I discuss and analyse the views of radical ecology and holistic environmental ethics to identify their underlying moral frameworks also considering internal logical coherence, practicality of application, and the implications for the human species. Chapter One presents and analyses the radical ecology position identifying the underlying ethical framework and consequent costs and benefits of this position with regards to humanity. Chapter Two follows the same method as Chapter One with the analysis of holistic environmental ethics. Chapter Three argues that both radical ecology and holistic environmental ethics are too quick to dismiss the uniqueness of the human condition. Revisiting the structures of radical ecology and holistic environmental ethics with the uniqueness of humanity in mind, I argue that these methods must be modified with a humanistic approach in order to establish a more logically coherent and plausible environmental ethic.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017

Pages