TWU Thesis Collection

Pages

Northern Psalms in Southern Contexts: Defining a Historical Setting for the Psalms of Asaph
Title:
Contributor:
Spencer J Elliott (author), Craig C Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The psalms of Asaph (50, 73-83) present an intriguing problem for their interpreters. Though these psalms show every sign of being used in the temple at Jerusalem, they contain a ponderous amount of traditions, geographic references, and names that would be more appropriate in Israel’s northern kingdom. The haphazard geographic and tradition-history provenance of these psalms is best reconciled by assuming a fundamental mixture between northern and southern material in the growing and cosmopolitan city of pre-exilic Jerusalem, beginning in the time of Hezekiah. As northern psalmists moved to Jerusalem after the conquests of the Assyrian empire in the late 8th c. BCE, they brought their traditions of worship and assimilated these traditions within the liturgies of Jerusalem’s temple. These psalms illumine how northern Israelites accommodated to their new Jerusalemite setting after 722 BCE, and how their psalms reflect their experience of forced displacement.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Reading Genesis 1-35 in Persian Yehud
Title:
Contributor:
Scott A. Bailey (author), Jim Scott (thesis supervisor), Craig Broyles (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Using a multi-dimensional historical-critical and literary method this thesis examines Genesis in a fixed socio-historical location, Achaemenid Persian period, and compares the polemic and function of the myths in Genesis to contemporaneous literature and competing ideology. The purpose of analyzing Genesis in such a fashion is to determine how the normative myths recontextualized in the text would have functioned polemically for the Yehud elite who had returned to a land with which they had ethnic ties, and who were empowered by the Persian Empire to govern. Ultimately, it is argued that while no history can be found in these myths, the paradigmatic actions of the patriarchs in Genesis communicate the ideology of the authors, and a great deal of the textual data can be explained through the historical setting of Persian Yehud, and the social, ethnic, religious, and political concerns of the Yehud elite.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Reading the Text With its Ancient Audience: The Amnon and Tamar Narrative as a Test Case
Title:
Contributor:
Jonathon M. Riley (author), Craig C. Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis seeks to demonstrate that the methods of narrative criticism can be employed in a modified way to address the problems with the intentional fallacy that are inherent in narrative criticism, and the tendency of narrative criticism to ignore historical-critical questions about the text. This modification will employ a new method to analyze the Amnon and Tamar narrative as follows: first use the historical-critical method to reconstruct JEDtrH, then use reception criticism to determine the ways in which the earliest audience of JEDtrH could have understood the text, then use narrative criticism to present one way in which one member of its earliest audience could have understood one pericope within the text. This analysis is preceded by a chapter explaining the interpretive styles associated with narrative criticism.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Reconstructing the text of the church : the “canonical text” and the goal of New Testament textual criticism
Title:
Contributor:
David R. Herbison (author), Craig Allert (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Kent Clarke (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
Amidst recent doubts about the feasibility of achieving New Testament textual criticism’s traditional goal of establishing the “original text” of the New Testament, Brevard Childs proposed that text critics should go about reconstructing the “canonical text” instead. However, concepts of “canon” have generally been limited to discussions of which books were included or excluded from a list of authoritative writings, not necessarily the specific textual readings within those writings. This thesis considers whether there is historical evidence to support the existence of such a “canonical text” of the New Testament, and whether modern text critics and exegetes should prefer this textform to more traditional reconstructions. This study concludes that there is little evidence to support the existence of a lost “canonical text” of the New Testament, and that even if one assumes the existence of such a text, there are good reasons for continuing to prefer more traditional reconstructions.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
A Sanctuary in Time: Exploring Genesis 1’s Memory of Creation
Title:
Contributor:
Kyle R.L. Parsons (author), Craig C. Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Since the days of Wellhausen, pentateuchal scholarship has essentially agreed that Gen 1 and Gen 2 are from two distinct sources. Furthermore, they agree that Gen 1 was added in front of Gen 2 at a relatively late period during the Pentateuch's compositional history. Moving beyond these agreements, this thesis asks why Gen 1, and its cultural memory of creation, was added in front of Gen 2? In other words, what motivated a later group to come along and add Gen 1? As such, this thesis argues that Gen 1 was intentionally added in order to primarily elevate the Sabbath to a position and status equal to the Temple/Tabernacle. In mnemonic terms, then, Gen 1 is a countermemory that resulted in a shift away from sacred space toward sacred time. A mnemonic shift from the sanctuary in Jerusalem to a sanctuary in time.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Syntax in the Septuagint : with special reference to relative clauses in Greek numbers
Title:
Contributor:
Spencer Jones (author), Dirk Büchner (thesis supervisor), Robert J. V. Hiebert (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
When compared with compositional works of Koiné Greek, the syntax of the Septuagint can appear peculiar in some ways and quite familiar in others. In order to provide an approach that accounts for this peculiarity and enables rigorous syntactical interpretation of the Septuagint, this thesis develops a hypothesis that Septuagintal syntax is reflective of Koiné syntax with a measure of Hebrew influence. It then sets forth a methodology that takes into full account both Greek syntactical strictures and Hebrew interference, and situates this methodology among other approaches to Septuagintal syntax. Subsequently, this study applies its method to a detailed analysis of a few aspects of relative clauses in the Septuagint, namely, the variation of relative pronouns and use of resumptive pronouns in relative clauses. It concludes that the method followed in this study is successful in analyzing the unusual syntax of the Septuagint and could be applied broadly.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
"The Relation of Ra 2110, or P. Bodmer XXIV, to Origen's Hexapla: A Study in the Textual History of the Greek Psalter"
Title:
Contributor:
Brian P Baucom (author), Dirk Büchner (thesis supervisor), Robert J. V. Hiebert (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis presents the results of a detailed comparative analysis of the earliest known Greek text of Rahlfs's so-called Upper Egyptian text group (Rahlfs 2110) and the Gallican Psalter, as well as other hexaplaric witnesses as presented in Field's collection of hexaplaric fragments. This paper goes beyond the initial study conducted by Albert Pietersma in which he analyzed asterisked and obelized readings of the Gallican Psalter in comparison to Ra 2110 ("Origen's Corrections and the Text of P. Bodmer XXIV" [1993]). The results of my research reveal that Ra 2110 contains a number of hebraizing readings that agree with the Gallican Psalter. Some of the shared readings may be merely coincidence, others may be based on a shared connection to other witnesses thus eliminating the connection between Ra 2110 and Origen’s Hexapla of the Psalms; however, others seem to indicate a closer relationship between Origen's Hexapla and Ra 2110.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
To Extend the Sight of the Soul : An Analysis of Sacramental Ontology in the Mystagogical Homilies of Theodore of Mopsuestia
Title:
Contributor:
Hanna J. Lucas (author), Craig Allert (thesis supervisor), Hans Boersma (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Mystagogy, a bishop's instruction to the newly baptized on the meaning of the Sacraments, emerged as a form of fourth century Christian catechesis which involved the experience of the liturgy, the explanation of the mysteries through typological interpretation, and it included the tacit conveyance of an “articulated worldview.” This worldview was that of the Platonist-Christian synthesis. This patristic worldview hinged upon a foundational assumption of the sacramental participation of the created world in the eternal; it hinged upon a sacramental ontology. This thesis seeks to highlight the ways in which this sacramental ontology is expressed and imparted to the catechumens throughout Theodore of Mopsuestia’s mystagogical teachings. This investigation will explore examples from within Theodore’s general Christology and from his mystagogy which reveal the dynamic presence of this ontology, and also the unique emphases towards which Theodore, as a fourth century Antiochene thinker, is inclined.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Tracking Changes: A Proposal for a Linguistically Sensitive Schema for Categorizing Textual Variation of Hebrew Bible Texts in Light of Variant Scribal Practices Among the Judean Desert Psalms Witnesses
Title:
Contributor:
David Sigrist (author), Martin Abegg Jr. (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The Judaean Desert discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of the textual development and transmission of the Hebrew Bible. Accordingly, after almost seventy years of research, four theories of textual transmission have become predominant. Nevertheless, in recent years the need to incorporate Second Temple scribal practices and historical linguistics into current philological methods and text-critical approaches has come to the forefront. This thesis proposes a linguistically sensitive schema for categorizing variation of Hebrew Bible texts, which serves to incorporate historical linguistic insights alongside existing philological models. Using such a schema this thesis presents three case studies from the Psalms to test whether or not the identification of variant scribal practices, as discernible from computational linguistics, can sufficiently explain the variation found among Judaean Desert psalms witnesses. The conclusion affirms the validity and utility of such a schema and perspective for Hebrew Bible textual studies.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Translation and interpretation in the Septuagint version of the Balaam account
Title:
Contributor:
Kyle A. Biersdorff (author), Robert J. V. Hiebert (thesis supervisor), Larry J. Perkins (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Although the Septuagint translation of the Balaam account is in many ways similar to that found elsewhere in the LXX Pentateuch, two aspects of the translation are distinctive in the LXX and important indicators of the translator's interpretation of the text. First, the translator frequently represents the Hebrew יהוה with the Greek θεός, a striking departure from the normal LXX translation practice. This divergence likely reflects an anti-Balaam bias on the part of the translator. Second, the translator gives unusual renderings for portions of Balaam's oracles. These are often cited as evidence of Septuagintal messianic interpretation. This thesis surveys the LXX translation of the Balaam account and examines these two issues in the context of textual transmission, the linguistic constraints of the source and target languages, translation practice elsewhere in the Septuagint, and in other related literature of the period.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Understanding Πνευματικός in First Corinthians: Paul’s Corrective Vision for Spirit Life
Title:
Contributor:
Jeffrey S. Peters (author), Larry J. Perkins (thesis supervisor), Tony Cummins (second reader), Sven K. Soderlund (third reader), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Many English Bible translations use the term “spiritual” to translate the Greek adjective πνευματικός. Some translations are exploring alternative ways to render πνευματικός in an attempt to be more specific about what it means, indicating the word “spiritual” may not be an adequate understanding of πνευματικός. Fifteen of twenty-six occurrences of πνευματικός in the New Testament occur in 1 Corinthians. The goal of this project is to ask, Why does Paul repeatedly use the term πνευματικός in 1 Corinthians? This project will clarify the context of 1 Corinthians and why Paul used the term πνευματικός the way he did, and will evaluate that use in light of the broader meaning of πνευματικός. I will argue that this adjective always means “pertaining to the πνεῦμα,” and in Paul’s letters the particular focus is almost always on the πνεῦμα of God, that is, in New Testament terms, the Holy Spirit. Paul’s usage of πνευματικός in 1 Corinthians is part of a corrective response to the distorted pneumatology of some in the Corinthian church. Paul’s vision is for an eschatological community of Christ, empowered by and living obediently to the Spirit in contrast to the schismatic, dysfunctional community that had arisen in Corinth during his absence.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
YHWH as Gardener in the Old Testament with special reference to Psalm 104
Title:
Contributor:
Jeehoon B. Kim (author), Craig Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The aim of the present study is to investigate Psalm 104 as a whole and to determine its biblical-theological contribution to Israelite thinking of creation. Its methods are comparative-historical, semantic, literary, and biblical theological. I argue that the psalmist uses not only images that are reminiscent of the sun-god and storm-god of the ancient Near East but also images that reflect an ancient garden or park. Thus, the thesis of this study is that Psalm 104 portrays creation as a garden and YHWH as the royal gardener who creates it and oversees its care. As ancient gardens were built and maintained in order to reflect creation with a diversity of plants and animals, the provision of water, and ecological order, the psalm portrays creation by using images that allude to an ancient garden.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013

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