TWU Thesis Collection

Pages

Sea Change: Nursing in Bella Bella, 1901-1925
Title:
Contributor:
Sarah Colleen Cook (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Geertje Boschma (second reader), Laurie Meijer Drees (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In the early 1900s, the Heiltsuk village of Bella Bella (Wáglísla) in Northwest British Columbia boasted a new Methodist mission hospital and a small Training School for Nurses. This study explores the largely unknown history of missionary nursing in Bella Bella between 1901 and 1925, built around the private documents of Doris Nichols, who began her nursing training there in 1921. This study critically examines the experiences of early nurse missionaries—students and graduates —who lived, learned, worked, and worshiped as a part of the Methodist medical mission in Bella Bella and to the surrounding area. As a social history, this study reflects on those experiences through the lenses of gender, age, class, race, region, and religion. This exploration concludes that Doris Nichols’ rare experience was interconnected with—and an extension of—the profound changes that occurred for the Heiltsuk, the Methodist missions, nursing education, and Doris herself.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Seeking the Body Electric: The Role of Embodied Affective Experience in the Process of Recovery From Anorexia Nervosa
Title:
Contributor:
Chelsea D. Beyer (author), Mihaela Launeanu (thesis supervisor), Janelle Kwee (second reader), Faith Auton-Cuff (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Anorexia nervosa (AN) is presently defined by restriction of energy intake, low body weight, fear of gaining weight, and disturbances in body image (American Psychological Association, 2013). Absent from the current framework of AN is the acknowledgement of embodied and lived experience. Alternatively, the Developmental Theory of Embodiment (DTE), founded on Merleau-Ponty’s conceptualization of embodiment, proposed that AN develops from complex interactions between the embodied female self and the sociocultural context in which it is situated (Piran & Teall, 2012). Extending from the framework of the DTE, the purpose of the study was to explore the role of embodied and affective experience in women with AN through the process of recovery using body-centered poetic discourse as a method of inquiry. Six women diagnosed with AN reflected on three time points of their recovery journey: at the worst of the eating disorder, in recovery, and towards unified body-self. Thematic analysis of poetic discourse resulted in the identification of eleven embodiment and three affective themes. Moreover, three body-self patterns emerged from the AN recovery process: bifurcated, recovered, and unified body-self. With recovery from AN, poetic discourse displayed a pattern of shifting from negative embodied experience to positive embodied experience. The change in the affective experience was intertwined with that in the embodied experience, likewise shifting from negative or absent to positive. Findings illustrated recovery from AN as parallel to the restoration of embodied lived experience. The clinical and societal implications of these findings are discussed in terms of reforming conceptualization and prevention of AN.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Self-concept and Juvenile Diabetes in Young Adulthood
Title:
Contributor:
Lisa Steenburgh (author), Joan Kimball (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explored self-concept and living with juvenile diabetes in young adulthood. Eight young adults ages 19-29 who self-identified as having juvenile diabetes participated in one to two-hour semi-structured interviews. Interviews were analyzed using the descriptive phenomenological approach, as outlined by Giorgi and Giorgi (2003a). Being shaped but not defined by juvenile diabetes emerged as the essence of the young adults' experiences. Self-concept was shaped by diabetes in three main ways: (1) becoming more responsible, mature and resilient, (2) planning ahead and thinking critically, and (3) gaining empathy. Underlying several themes was the choice participants made to stay positive and maintain hope. They separated symptoms from self, and as much as possible did not let diabetes limit them. Paradoxically, limitations helped them develop skills that put them ahead in other areas of their lives. Findings are particularly relevant for mental health professionals working with young adults living with chronic illness.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
A semiotic perspective on the positive transfer of L1 structure in second language instruction
Title:
Contributor:
Rachael Caunce (author), William Acton (thesis supervisor), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Language educators are re-examining the benefits of positive transfer. As the usage of the term language interference is misleading, the benefits of positive transfer have not been fully recognized until recently. When considered from a semiotic perspective with reference to language acquisition, neurolinguistic and applied linguistic theories, language interference can be perceived as a symptom of equivocal signs. It is proposed that student's learner errors may be attributed to a phenomenon called `semiotic confusion', which is a specific state of disorientation caused by a misinterpretation of signs. Consequently, language interference is redefined as a symptom of `semiotic confusion'. A hypothetical model, the Personal Semiotic Cultural Consciousness/ Semiotic Cultural Consciousness (PSCC/SCC), which is composed of two competing states of consciousness that correspond with synthetic and analytic brain functioning provides instructors with insights about the importance of activating their students' internal and external semiotic cultural consciousness through somatosensory signs such as colour.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
The significance of Karl Barth’s conception of petitionary prayer as divine–human correspondence in church dogmatics, iv/4 and the Christian life: cd, iv/4: lecture fragments
Title:
Contributor:
Suzette Benjamin (author), Archibald Spencer (thesis supervisor), Ken Radant (second reader), Ross Hastings (external examiner), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Karl Barth claims in Church Dogmatics that calling upon God as Father in prayer (invocation) is exemplary human action. Barth’s treatment of prayer in this way provides a different vantage point on the topic of prayer than is often studied in contemporary Christian scholarship, where Christian prayer is studied to establish its devotional or community value. Barth’s presentation of prayer is worth studying because it reveals prayer as the vehicle through which humans learn about themselves and about God. Moreover, prayer reveals God’s divine nature as He connects with the Christian pray-er. Barth calls this relationship between God and the Christian divine–human correspondence. My focus is to explore Barth’s theology to determine the significance of prayer in the context of divine–human correspondence and then to relate it to prayer in everyday Christian life. I conclude that prayer, as effective human action, is inherent to human correspondence with God.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Silenced Voices: Hearing Biblical Women Through the Genesis Apocryphon
Title:
Contributor:
Shelby Bennett (author), Andrew B. Perrin (thesis supervisor), Robynne Rogers Healey (second reader), Craig C. Broyles (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The #MeToo movement broke the silence around abuse of women. Within the church, women’s voices have been dismissed, disbelieved, or intimidated into silence, reflecting the Bible’s depiction of women as passive and silent, if mentioned. In stark contrast, a new text found in the Dead Sea Scrolls – called the Genesis Apocryphon – contains a retelling of Genesis stories in which the women are named, identified, and given speech and action. Why did these ancient scribes choose to expand the female characters? This study employs both biblical and feminist studies to examine the four stories of women in the Genesis Apocryphon: the women of the Watchers myth, Batenosh, Emzara, and Sarai. It finds the Second Temple authors expanding female characters’ identities in order to emphasize endogamous marriages. The Genesis Apocryphon’s inclusion of women’s voices illuminates the deafening silence of Genesis and points a way forward for biblical interpretation and feminist praxis today.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2021
The Space Between Us: A Phenomenological Study of Shame in Elite Athletics
Title:
Contributor:
Kristin A Konieczny (author), Dr. Derrick W Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Dr. Mihaela S Launeanu (thesis supervisor), Dr. Gretchen Kerr (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study sought to understand elite athletes’ experiences of shame. The question that guided this research was how is the phenomenon of shame lived in the experiences of elite athletes? In order to understand how participants experienced shame, a hermeneutic phenomenological approach to research (van Manen, 1990, 2014, Launeanu, et al., 2018) was used. Seven retired elite athletes were interviewed about their experiences. Through the participants’ lived experience descriptions, shame was uncovered as (a) a dialogical phenomenon revealed in the space between persons, (b) characterized by feeling personally violated and subsequently vulnerable, (c) embodied in acts of hiding from self and others, and (d) the portal or gateway to encountering a person as they are. From these essential features emerged the metaphor of shame as a dance, which represented a dynamic relational space permeating the dialogical rhythm of an encounter of two persons. This dialogical rhythm also unveiled and pointed to the essential qualities of the person experiencing shame. These findings highlighted that research, theory and clinical practice within sport and counselling psychology would benefit from understanding shame as having a protective, self-revelatory quality.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
Strengthening relationships through mindfulness practices
Title:
Contributor:
Sandeep Bhandal (author), Robert Lees (thesis supervisor), Gurmeet Singh (second reader), Keli Anderson (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
From birth onward, child development is shaped by the environmental context in which children are raised and relationships with their primary caregivers. Emotion regulation is a foundational skill that impacts the parent-child relationship. Mindfulness-Based Emotion Regulation (MBER) is one course offered to caregivers focused on strengthening emotion regulation among parents, using mindfulness. Using the Enhanced Critical Incident Technique methodology, individual interviews were conducted with eight participants, who shared their application of the material to their family life. Two research questions were examined, addressing what helped, hindered, and what participants wish in mindfulness education to create healthier relationships to their children. Results showed that the helpful incidents outweighed the number of hindering and wish list incidents. Participants reported feeling motivated to incorporate mindfulness in their relationships, and more confident as a caregiver. The purpose of the current project is to increase our knowledge about using a family-centered approach with our clients.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
A STUDY OF RECONCILIATION FOR GRADUATE COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS
Title:
Contributor:
Nicole Kruger (author), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor), Patricia Victor (second reader), Janelle Kwee (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The current research project investigates a previously undiscovered part of the underlying process of how non-Indigenous Counselling Psychology graduate students make sense of reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples in Canada. This Grounded Theory study sheds light on how the participant's core processes stabilize and destabilize social constructs and thinking. The current study reflects the developing themes for emerging adults in Canada's system. The present work argues that reconciliation on a societal level begins with questioning and creating new narratives individually. However, reconciliation also focuses on a system approach to truth and how this relates to settler/White denial issues. Six processes reveal the factors that facilitate and hinder the potential for societal reconciliation in the Canadian context.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2021
The Subjective Experience of Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease: Using Online Communities to Combat Social Isolation.
Title:
Contributor:
Nirvana White (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Faith Richardson (second reader), Gina Gaspard (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis explores the ways people with early onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD) use online communities to address social isolation. Netnography and interpretive description directed the qualitative analysis of archived discussion threads (n=569) within an online forum involving 40 participants with EOAD. Online interaction fostered social connection and redefined life following diagnosis. Textual discourse focused on normalizing the experience of living with EOAD, promoting a community culture of belonging, and developing coping mechanisms intended to enhance self-care and preserve independence. Members found purpose in using the forum as a platform to empower users, or through learning about advocacy roles outside of the online environment. Technological concerns and caregiver involvement surfaced as potential factors impacting online interaction. Overarching findings were conceptualized as benefits offered through the communication medium or motivated by community members. Attention was drawn to technical and practical considerations that focused on enhancing the social experience and supporting overall well-being.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Supporting the Supporter: Exploring Well-Being in the Face of Vicarious Trauma
Title:
Contributor:
Victor Jun Hyung Lee (author), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor), Darae Lee (second reader), Teresa Puvimanasinghe (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Helping professionals working with clients who have lived through trauma often carry with them a risk of vicarious traumatization (VT) as well as the potential for vicarious posttraumatic growth (VPTG). The vicarious impacts of trauma have been explored among diverse helping practitioners but VPTG studies among refugee workers has been scarce. This thematic narrative study explored how service providers are personally thriving because of working with refugees. Six helpers and the researcher co-constructed narratives about how their work with refugee trauma survivors has cultivated personal growth and well-being. Qualitative results showed that VPTG as an alternative narrative to VT was personally empowering for refugee workers in the face of refugee clients’ trauma. Results further revealed that mutual relationships and allyship color sustainable growth at the heart of VPTG. These findings on refugee workers in Canada have important implications for service providers’ well-being, service quality, policy, and refugee clients’ health.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2021
Swahili conditional constructions in embodied Frames of Reference: Modeling semantics, pragmatics, and context-sensitivity in UML mental spaces
Title:
Contributor:
Roderick D. Fish (author), Steve Nicolle (thesis supervisor), Bruce Wiebe (second reader), Jamin Pelkey (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Studies of several languages, including Swahili [swa], suggest that realis (actual, realizable) and irrealis (unlikely, counterfactual) meanings vary along a scale (e.g., 0.0–1.0). T-values (True, False) and P-values (probability) account for this pattern. However, logic cannot describe or explain (a) epistemic stances toward beliefs, (b) deontic and dynamic stances toward states-of-being and actions, and (c) context-sensitivity in conditional interpretations. (a)–(b) are deictic properties (positions, distance) of ‘embodied’ Frames of Reference (FoRs)—space-time loci in which agents perceive and from which they contextually act (Rohrer 2007a, b). I argue that the embodied FoR describes and explains (a)–(c) better than T-values and P-values alone. In this cognitive-functional-descriptive study, I represent these embodied FoRs using Unified Modeling LanguageTM (UML) mental spaces in analyzing Swahili conditional constructions to show how necessary, sufficient, and contributing conditions obtain on the embodied FoR networks level.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020

Pages