TWU Thesis Collection

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We-ness : couple identity as shared by male partners of breast cancer patients
Title:
Contributor:
Jillian Hart (author), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor), Joanne Stephen (second reader), David Reid (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The present study explored the wider relational context of partners of women facing cancer. Seven male partners of breast cancer patients shared their experience of being a partner to a woman going through cancer. Dialogal phenomenology allowed for clarification of the landscape of these partners' experience by providing opportunity to formulate their experience and to unfold meanings attributed to this experience. Seven themes were identified: crisis and aftermath; children, parenting, and fertility; personal impact; breast cancer as a shared experience; honouring voices and voice; relational choreography; and relational outlook. These men shared different ways that being a partner of a woman with cancer is a shared experience. One pattern that emerged describes how a "you and me" couple identity framework can shift into a "we" perspective. These results revealed how couple identity emerged in relational patterns of engagement during conversational interviewing, a distinctive feature that fits well with previous findings.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Western trained nurses transitioning to Qatar : perceptions of their nursing role
Title:
Contributor:
Carnelle Symes (author), Barbara Astle (thesis supervisor), Sonya Jakubec (second reader), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Nurses’ self-perceptions of their role when transitioning from a Western nursing context to a Middle Eastern one are not clearly understood. In a qualitative study, seven participants who transitioned to Qatar were interviewed about their self-perceptions of their nursing role, personally and professionally. The core theme of opportunity and categorical themes of adapting to the changing role of the nurse, adapting to the context, and adapting by “taking it in stride” emerged from the data, all of which influenced the nurses’ transition to Qatar. Conclusions were: 1) Opportunity exists both personally and professionally with transition; 2) Adaption occurred over time; 3) Perception of nursing role is influenced by cultural understanding; 4) Participants described themselves as leaders; 5) Nursing literature on this topic is underdeveloped; 6) A greater number of transition experiences lead to greater adaption strategies. The transition experiences for these nurses were viewed as positive; however, challenges were experienced to varying degrees.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
What are Nurses’ Perceptions of Nurse-to-Nurse Incivility in the Workplace?
Title:
Contributor:
Julianne R. House (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Maggie Theron (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Lynn Musto (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
While nursing has flourished into an autonomous, compassionate and scholarly profession, an insidious, pervasive problem exists within some nursing environments: workplace incivility. Disrespectful and disruptive behaviour including incivility, bullying, and harassment are well documented in the nursing literature but little research has examined the perceptions of nurses who witness nurse-to-nurse incivility. This qualitative study examines nurses’ perceptions after witnessing incivility in their workplaces. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 registered nurses to examine their perceptions after witnessing workplace incivility. Using interpretive description methodology, the overarching theme of avoiding confrontation was identified. Main themes generated from data analysis included normalizing incivility and the relationship between incivility and the workplace. Recommendations for the nursing profession include: increasing awareness and education regarding workplace incivility and how to manage it; fostering supportive work environments for frontline staff and management; and educating nursing students and registered nurses that this behaviour is not acceptable and teaching them how to respond to incivility.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
What characteristics are keeping nurses flourishing in difficult environments: An appreciative inquiry study
Title:
Contributor:
Laura Del Rio Torres (author), Landa Terblanche (thesis supervisor), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Faith Richardson (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Many studies document the adversities facing nurses today. However, little research examines resiliency among nurses and their ability to flourish amidst these adversities. Using a qualitative method, this thesis aimed to address this gap by examining life-giving factors that allow nurses to be resilient and flourish in unhealthy environments. Using appreciative inquiry methodology, nine nurses working in British Columbia were interviewed. These interviews focused on their positive perspectives and experiences to identify life-giving factors influencing resiliency. Six themes were identified in the development of resiliency: personal life; a sense of purpose/calling; intrinsic characteristics; education and career opportunity; workplace culture, and reflection and self awareness. Resiliency can exist even if all six themes are not present; however, in order to flourish all six themes must be in a healthy state. This thesis provides practical wisdom that can be applied to all areas of nursing in order to promote resiliency and flourishing.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Women's Experiences of Healing After Sex Trafficking in Canada
Title:
Contributor:
Amy C Kobelt (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Jennifer Mervyn (second reader), Barbara Astle (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In Canada sex trafficking is a hidden crime that impacts women of every race and socioeconomic status, though Indigenous women are disproportionately represented as victims. This study provided a platform to listen to seven female survivors’ experiences of healing, strength and resiliency after they were freed from exploitation in Canada to counteract victim’s experiences of oppression and silencing. The qualitative feminist method of the listening guide was utilized to provide victim-informed research driven by participant’s narratives. Two categories of voices emerged in participants’ narratives: voices of resistance and voices of healing. The voices of resistance (oppression, dismissal, avoidance, confusion, and disconnection), spoke about obstacles and barriers in healing, while voices of healing (connection, knowing, compassion, resilience, advocacy, agency, and purpose), captured women’s stories of healing. Survivors were found to experience healing through connection with themselves and others, mastery of new skills, regaining their autonomy, finding purpose, and sharing their stories.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Women’s Perspectives on What Helped and Hindered Building Shame Resilience During an Adolescent Eating Disorder
Title:
Contributor:
Hilary A. Evans (author), Kathryn Weaver (third reader), Krista D. Socholotiuk (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Mihaela S. Launeanu (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
Eating disorders (EDs) in adolescence are serious mental health disorders that commonly have noteworthy medical and mental health comorbidities (Fitzsimmons-Craft, Karam, Wilfley, 2018). Shame has been found to be a significant factor associated with EDs (Burney & Irwin, 2000; Goss & Allan, 2009; Waller, Ohanian, Meyer & Osman, 2000), yet no studies have explored what helps and hinders building shame resilience during adolescence from the perspective of the adult who lived through it. This retrospective qualitative study used the enhanced critical incident technique (Butterfield, Borgen, Maglio, & Amundson, 2009), and the sample of this study included women who received an ED diagnosis between the age of 11 and 21 (N = 10). Data analysis revealed 13 helping categories, 15 hindering categories, and 9 wish list items.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
A World of Their Own Making: Student Life at Southern Women’s Colleges, 1800-1865
Title:
Contributor:
Jessie VanderHeide (author), Robynne Healey (thesis supervisor), Brian Gobbett (second reader), Amrita C. Myers (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Since the 1980s, the majority of historical scholarship on southern women’s education has concentrated on seeking answers to the question “to what extent was antebellum southern women’s education an oppressive or liberating force?” While keenly noting that the emergence of women’s higher education in the early nineteenth-century South did not necessarily entail advancement for women,1 much of this existing scholarship, because it is focused on analysing institutional records, looks primarily at college curricula and practices to answer questions regarding the value of education; accordingly, this scholarship concludes that, while women’s higher education was new to the early nineteenth-century South, it did not offer southern women anything “new” in terms of social position and therefore was not ultimately a liberating force. While the existing scholarship is useful because it points out the engendered nature of southern women’s education, an exploration of students’ recollections of their college experiences challenges the conclusion that women’s colleges offered women nothing new and were ultimately oppressive forces. For while women’s college education was engendered in such a way that it aimed to reinforce pre-existing ideas concerning southern womanhood this does not necessarily mean that the ideals of women’s education matched its actual out-workings. Indeed, assuming that the “ideal” matched the “real” ignores female students’ responses to their engendered educations. Paying attention to students’ recollections of their college experiences reveals that the college experience actually granted young women the opportunity to shape their own female-controlled world in the midst of living in an intensely patriarchal society. Perhaps surprisingly, though, the world that these students shaped through their cultivation of academic, social, and religious cultures was one in which they not only challenged the gender ideals of southern society and thereby formed new identities as women, but one in which they also (somewhat paradoxically) upheld a hierarchical structure that undermined any type of sisterhood or collective redefinition of southern womanhood and, at times, even reinforced more traditional gender conventions. Thus, a study of southern women’s colleges that privileges the agency of female students not only provides a more complete picture of women’s education, but highlights the complexity of southern women’s identities and thereby contributes to wider discussions within southern and women’s history.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2012
Wound dressings during cancer radiotherapy : a survey of Canadian practice
Title:
Contributor:
Siby Elizabeth J Thomas (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Rosemary Kohr (second reader), Rick Sawatzky (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Patients who undergo radiotherapy typically experience changes to the skin in the area where the treatment is administered. Some discussions exist whether radiating through wound dressings will cause a boost effect to patients with cancer. The purpose of the thesis is to describe the current evidence and practice through literature review and a national environmental scan with the aim of developing the foundation for further research. After Research Ethics Boards approvals, one nurse per 34 Radiation Oncology Centres in Canada was contacted. Current practice survey data were collected from 18 Centres. Telephone interviews were conducted with four nurse participants to understand the context of nursing practice environment. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics for the survey data and thematic analysis for the interviews. The integrative results of the study were reviewed with five inter-professional experts. The study results are used to make recommendations for research, practice, leadership and policy.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Writings of an ancient poet : a theological composition of Aurelius Prudentius Clemens’ soteriology as depicted in his Liber Cathemerinon
Title:
Contributor:
Erika M. McAuley (author), Archie Spencer (thesis supervisor), Bruce Guenther (second reader), Christopher Morrissey (external examiner), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
By his poetic declarations concerning Jesus Christ, Prudentius appeals to some as a flagship for fourth-century Nicene theology. This thesis investigates the poet’s concept of salvation to determine its congruity with Nicaea’s underlying soteriology. To that end, Athanasius’ Against the Gentiles-On the Incarnation and Prudentius’ Liber Cathemerinon are read in juxtaposition, drawing out and comparing theological themes. Prudentius exhibits an inherent fixation on the problem of sin and its effect on salvation. This diminishes the significance and hope offered by the Incarnation. Yet, Athanasius purports that Nicaea’s Christological proclamations are founded on God’s saving action in Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection. Therefore, while the Christological confessions of Nicaea appear to prefigure the theology of Prudentius in his pastiche, Liber Cathemerinon, a closer analysis reveals that his conception of salvation is inconsistent with the underlying soteriological impetus of Nicene theology.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Written and spoken register differences in Baghdadi colloquial Arabic dramatic discourse
Title:
Contributor:
Hazel Twele (author), Richard Gravina (second reader), Steve Nicolle (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Sean Allison (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to describe linguistic differences between written scripts and the oral performances of those scripts in Baghdadi Colloquial Arabic dramatic discourse. The data involves 10 Biblical narratives written in a dramatized format with the intent of being performed. The scriptwriters’ goal was to create texts that were as similar to natural speech as possible. However, in spite of this goal, certain changes occurred throughout the stories when performed by mother tongue Baghdadi Arabic speakers. Although this study records all deletions, additions and substitutions in each of the ten stories, it will highlight three types of changes: the deletion of the connective wa ‘and’, the addition of repeated words and phrases, and diglossically motivated substitutions. These changes represent involvement strategies employed by the actors to accommodate the increased need for textual and interpersonal cohesion in the speaker-hearer dimension when changing the mode from writing to speaking.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
YHWH as Gardener in the Old Testament with special reference to Psalm 104
Title:
Contributor:
Jeehoon B. Kim (author), Craig Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The aim of the present study is to investigate Psalm 104 as a whole and to determine its biblical-theological contribution to Israelite thinking of creation. Its methods are comparative-historical, semantic, literary, and biblical theological. I argue that the psalmist uses not only images that are reminiscent of the sun-god and storm-god of the ancient Near East but also images that reflect an ancient garden or park. Thus, the thesis of this study is that Psalm 104 portrays creation as a garden and YHWH as the royal gardener who creates it and oversees its care. As ancient gardens were built and maintained in order to reflect creation with a diversity of plants and animals, the provision of water, and ecological order, the psalm portrays creation by using images that allude to an ancient garden.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
YHWH, the ineffable name : avoidance, alternations and circumventions in the non-biblical manuscripts at Qumran
Title:
Contributor:
Joëlle Alhadef-Lake (author), Martin G. Abegg, Jr. (thesis supervisor), Dorothy Peters (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
During the period of the writing of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Tetragrammaton (YHWH) was so sacred that it had become an ineffable name. This thesis studies alternations in the usage of the Tetragrammaton in non-biblical manuscripts at Qumran through an analysis of scriptural quotations from the Torah to the Nevi'im in the Dead Sea Scrolls citing the Tetragrammaton. Thirty-three distinctive divine name alternations were identified. Additionally, a list of alternation types and of scrolls featuring alternations in Qumran were compiled. Distinctive groups of scrolls were identified at Qumran: some featured the Tetragrammaton, with or without alternations, and some circumvented it completely. Our study focuses on the avoidance of the Tetragrammaton, on alternations in square script, and on writing traditions: El, Tetrapuncta and paleo-Hebrew. Two applications were then investigated: the use of alternations in divine names in order to determine the scrolls' origins and the distribution of names in paleo-Hebrew in these scrolls.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014

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