TWU Thesis Collection

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“Nothing about us without us!” Youth-led solutions to improve high school completion rates
Title:
Contributor:
Fred Chou (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Robert Lees (thesis supervisor), Marla Buchanan (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) study collaborated with six students from alternate education to inquire about the experiences of vulnerable youth--students who have disengaged from mainstream education. Utilizing the Enhanced Critical Incident Technique, youth researchers asked their peers: what helped and hindered their retention and success in mainstream and alternate education? Youth researchers engaged in authentic participation and took part in the iterative phases of YPAR--critical reflection and social action. Their involvement empowered them to advocate for their peers by disseminating the results and recommendations to key stakeholders within the community. Youth researchers conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. Overall, the findings show that relationships with staff and peers, flexibility, psychosocial and academic supports, and personal circumstances are vital in helping vulnerable students succeed in school. Engagement in YPAR provided insight on how to work with vulnerable youth in a manner that promotes agency and social change.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
“You will be like the gods” : the conceptualization of deity in the Hebrew Bible in cognitive perspective
Title:
Contributor:
Daniel O. McClellan (author), Craig Broyles (thesis supervisor), Martin Abegg (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis has two primary goals: (1) to analyze the countours and extent of the generic category of deity in the Hebrew Bible, and (2) propose a semantic base for the term. It begins with a description of the fields associated with cognitive theory, and particularly cognitive linguistics. Chapter 2 examines the cognitive origins of notions of deity and discusses how this heritage is reflected within the biblical texts. The third chapter examines the conceptualization of Israel’s prototypical deity, YHWH, beginning from the earliest divine profiles detectable within the text. In Chapter 4 the discussion returns to the generic notion of deity, highlighting references within the biblical text to deities other than YHWH. The conclusion synthesizes the different sections of the thesis, sketching the origins and development of the Hebrew Bible’s representation of both prototypical and non-prototypical notions of deity. Implications for further research are then briefly discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013

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