TWU Thesis Collection

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Embodiment of spirituality and sexuality : women’s lived experience of resilience to sexual shame
Title:
Contributor:
Kelsey Dawn Schmidt Siemens (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (second reader), Stephanie Martin (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Due to the prevalence of sexual shame among Christian women, this study was designed to better understand the lived experiences of sexual shame resilience and embodiment. Five young, married women were selected for inclusion based on their immersion in Christian culture during adolescence and for their experiences of working through sexual shame. In order to understand the meaning of these women’s experiences, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was employed. Through participant’s narratives, four categories of themes emerged (religious messaging around sexuality, experiences of sexual shame, healing experiences, and experiences of embodied sexuality). When participants were able to work through their sexual shame, they were able to embrace and find freedom in their sexuality. This study’s findings are consistent with Brown’s (2006) Shame Resilience Theory. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed in terms of the need to provide appropriate support for women struggling with sexual shame.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Employing Deuteronomy: an Analysis of the Quotations and Allusions to Deuteronomy in the Dead Sea Scrolls
Title:
Contributor:
Joshua M. Matson (author), Martin G. Abegg, Jr. (thesis supervisor), Andrew Perrin (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The study of quotations and allusions to the Hebrew Bible in religious texts has only recently began to be methodically approached and analyzed. Although previous studies on quotations and allusions to the Hebrew Bible in the Dead Sea Scrolls are amply available concerning individual manuscripts, no such study has sought to approach the subject from a perspective of universality. This study seeks to identify and analyze universal conclusions that have been obtained by a study of the quotations and allusions to Deuteronomy in all of the non-biblical Dead Sea Scrolls manuscripts. This is accomplished through an in-depth study of the history of studies on quotations and allusions in religious texts, a detailed explanation of the methodology utilized in this study, and an analysis of fifteen universal conclusions that are exhibited by the authors/scribes of the Dead Sea Scrolls when quoting or alluding to the Deuteronomy text of the Hebrew Bible.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
An Examination of the Underlying Moral Frameworks of Environmental Philosophy
Title:
Contributor:
Anna T Beresford (author), Myron A Penner (thesis supervisor), Grant Havers (second reader), Robert Doede (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In this paper I discuss and analyse the views of radical ecology and holistic environmental ethics to identify their underlying moral frameworks also considering internal logical coherence, practicality of application, and the implications for the human species. Chapter One presents and analyses the radical ecology position identifying the underlying ethical framework and consequent costs and benefits of this position with regards to humanity. Chapter Two follows the same method as Chapter One with the analysis of holistic environmental ethics. Chapter Three argues that both radical ecology and holistic environmental ethics are too quick to dismiss the uniqueness of the human condition. Revisiting the structures of radical ecology and holistic environmental ethics with the uniqueness of humanity in mind, I argue that these methods must be modified with a humanistic approach in order to establish a more logically coherent and plausible environmental ethic.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
The exegetical interpretation of Leviticus 19:1-18 and the restoration of the Jewish community in the post-exilic period
Title:
Contributor:
BaeSick P. Choi (author), Dirk Büchner (thesis supervisor), Craig Broyles (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The goal of this thesis to look at the functions of the commands and laws in Leviticus 19:1-8 as follows: (1) the function of Leviticus 19: 1-18 and the Holiness Code; (2) Leviticus 19:1-18 as an aid to the restoration of Jewish Community. (3) The Prophet Ezekiel's understanding of the Holiness Code and possible connections to Leviticus 19:1-18. The thesis is divided into sections as follows: Chapter 1 will present an exegesis of Leviticus 19:1-18. The relationship between these two sources will be discussed in chapters 1 and 2 in order to show the function of Leviticus 19 in relation to the other Pentateuchal sources. Chapter 2 will examine the life of the Jews in the exilic. Chapter 3 will present the ideas in Leviticus 19 against life in the exile. The Book of Ezekiel with its close relationship to H will also be brought into focus.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Experiences of women in early labour sent home following hospital assessment
Title:
Contributor:
Marilyn Morson (author), Landa Terblanche (thesis supervisor), Maggie Theron (second reader), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Labour and birth is a life event common to many women yet the physical process, in addition to psychological, social, and spiritual experiences, is unique to each woman. A woman under the care of a physician will come to a hospital when she believes she is in labour. If she is in active labour, the woman is admitted to hospital. If in early labour, the woman is often sent to walk within the hospital prior to reassessment as walking can contribute to progress in labour, or she is sent home. There is limited information about the phenomenon when a woman in early labour is sent home until she is admitted in active labour. Combining the elements of early labour and known possible psychosocial outcomes of birth, this qualitative study explored the experiences of women sent home in early labour within the context of one hospital site in Canada, having 4000 births annually. In-depth interviews with 10 postpartum women within 48 hours of birth yielded the data that were analyzed through a qualitative approach using interpretive description defined by Thorne, Reimer-Kirkham and MacDonald-Emes (1997), and using methods of analysis as outlined by Giorgi (2012). Themes resulting from this analysis were: Conflict between knowledge of labour symptoms and women’s initial responses; background influences and current pregnancy concerns; impact of the unspoken; experiences of pain and coping; and influence of others. Through literature integration it was concluded that all women experience an overwhelming anxiety that may empower/disempower their self-efficacy, confidence, communication with self/others and their coping. Suggestions for practice include a culture of open access to the assessment area and a focus on communication with women in early labour to better understand their individual needs and provide support to decrease anxiety and fear, increase confidence and foster empowerment.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Exploring How Family Members Experience Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD)
Title:
Contributor:
Kelly C H Schutt (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (second reader), Jennifer Gibson (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explored how family members experience Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD), since the 2016 Canadian legislation. The Listening Guide, a qualitative research methodology, was used to hear the experiences of seven family members from across Canada, whose loved one received MAiD. Analyses revealed that family members experienced tension in negotiating relationship to themselves, to their loved one, and to others involved. These tensions were heard in four voices throughout the study: witnessing, caregiving, honouring choice and supporting dignity, and surrendering and letting go. Current procedures and policies tend to focus on the individual receiving MAiD. Shifting practices to align with relational ethics could challenge healthcare providers to consider how they might support family members. By acknowledging the social context of the patient receiving MAiD, this study extends the discourse surrounding MAiD beyond the realm of individual autonomy, suggesting a shift in care from being patient-focused to being truly person-centred.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
Exploring the Experience of Mothers Who Have Children with Albinism in Tanzania: A Critical Ethnography
Title:
Contributor:
Emma B. Strobell (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Barbara J. Astle (second reader), Sonya Sharma (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Little is understood about the everyday lives of mothers of children with albinism in sub-Saharan Africa, specifically Tanzania. This region has a harrowing history of discrimination and violent attacks against persons with albinism, largely rooted in cultural/spiritual beliefs and practices, and perpetuated by layers of myth about albinism. A focused critical ethnographic study, through the lens of Hudson-Weems’ (2019) Africana Womanism, explored the experiences of mothers of children with albinism in Tanzania, addressed the gendered nature of this condition, and considered the human rights and resilience of the mothers. One participant’s story illuminated human rights and resilience from a mother’s standpoint, which was the backdrop for the presentation of findings that included stories of other mothers with albinism and the perspectives of key stakeholders. These findings highlight the social ecological nature of resilience for these mothers. Recommendations focus on policy, advocacy, and research related to health and social services and education.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
Extending the spirit : a qualitative secondary analysis on nurses’ perspectives on spirituality
Title:
Contributor:
Kyla Janzen (author), Barbara Astle (thesis supervisor), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Linda Shea (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Once laden with promise, modernization and secularization have not remedied the societal ills of our time. Individuals have begun to seek answers outside of the confines of traditional religion, often developing a personalized spirituality. As Canadian society returns its attention to spirituality, nursing acts of spiritual care arguably gain importance. The purpose of this study was to explore the influences on spirituality and spiritual caregiving in nursing practice. This qualitative secondary analysis compared and contrasted the narratives of fourteen nurses: eight from acute settings and six from community settings. The participants self-identified their spiritual/religious affiliations: Christians, Catholic, Muslim, spiritual but not religious, and not spiritual or religious. From an interpretative descriptive framework, five nested themes were identified as influencing spiritual caregiving in healthcare contexts: the nurse as custodian of spiritual caregiving, nursing acts of spiritual caregiving, professional and organizational silence, distinctive environments, and the Canadian milieu.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2012
Faculty Preparation for Accompanying Nursing Students on International Experiences: Moving Beyond Trial-and-Error
Title:
Contributor:
Amanda Grace Egert (author), Barbara J Astle (thesis supervisor), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Sonya Jakubec (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Many Canadian nursing programs offer international experiences (IEs) as educational opportunities for students. While evidence of pre-departure preparation exists for students, little is known about the preparation of faculty who accompany them. In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine novice-to-expert nursing faculty to explore faculty preparation for accompanying nursing students on IEs. The interpretive description design was informed by critical inquiry methods which examined preparation alignment with critical global perspectives. Four themes were interpreted including: the overarching theme of gaining preparation expertise over time, and three main themes of learning on-the-job, discovering the different responsibilities, and learning for-the-job. In the findings, experience was emphasized over formal preparation. Additionally, preparation was complicated by a lack of global health knowledge and a lack of institutional support. Recommendations include moving beyond learning from trial-and-error and moving towards intentional preparation that better considers the experience, knowledge, skills, and attitudes for preparing nursing faculty for IEs.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Fiction in the Integrated Circuit
Title:
Contributor:
Eric A. Stein (author), Jens Zimmermann (thesis supervisor), Holly F. Nelson (second reader), John Bonnett (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study takes up the question of the cyborg through a close reading of key historical texts in the technical and scientific literature informing modern integrated circuit technology, and of twentieth- and twenty-first century texts in continental theory and philosophy, in order to present a viable notion of subjectivity for our technological age. To this end, this study articulates a morphology of the cyborg as a philosophical, political, and technological subject uniquely situated and acting in the world, a subject that upends conceptions of truth and knowledge as representation or correspondence. The cyborg instead presents a playful sensibility in touch with the openness of existence itself to becoming, newness, and life. Through her skillful traversal of the world-machine the cyborg resists established networks of power, creating havens of intimacy in the dark away from the searing light of transcendental reason.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Formation by Christocentricity-Grace-Spirit : Applying a Redemptive-Historical Preaching Paradigm to the Chinese Christian Community in Metro Vancouver
Title:
Contributor:
Peter Kwok-Ping Choy (author), Larry Perkins (thesis supervisor), Daryl Busby (second reader), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution), Hing-Kau (Jason) Yeung (external examiner)
Abstract:
Assuming the potential practice of egocentric and works-based moralism in the Chinese Christian community in Metro Vancouver, this project investigates the validity of applying a redemptive-historical preaching paradigm to the community that may address this moralistic problem. This preaching paradigm emphasizes Christocentric, grace-based and pneumatic aspects in the redemptive truth, and this paper argues that from a gospel-kingdom perspective this triple-emphasis of proclamation provides the most effective solution to the matter and that only "through this proclamation by the Holy Spirit" generates a genuine spiritual formation in Christian life (true love and obedience towards God).
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Going Through A 24-Hour Box: How Women’s Experiences of Childbirth Shape Their Embodied Sense of Self
Title:
Contributor:
Neeta Sai (author), Dr. Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Dr. Mihaela Launeanu (second reader), Dr. Keren Epstein-Gilboa (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Women’s experiences of childbirth are understood primarily in terms of role change and physical or cognitive impacts. This study adopted a holistic, embodied perspective to explore how women’s childbirth experiences shape their embodied sense of self. Six women’s childbirth experiences were analysed using Gilligan’s (1982) Listening Guide method, adapted by integrating Längle’s (1993) Existential Analysis framework of the Four Fundamental Motivations. The analysis uncovered women’s voices of fulfillment and suffering as dynamic interplay suggesting that positive birth experience led to positive embodied sense of self while negative birth experience (e.g., disrupted embodiment) led to negative sense of self. These findings indicate that childbirth and motherhood can empower women to grow and be strong even in spite of possible traumatic or negative birth experience. This study has important implications for promoting a holistic understanding of the role of women’s subjective experiences of childbirth in shaping their embodied sense of self.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018

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