TWU Thesis Collection

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YHWH, the ineffable name : avoidance, alternations and circumventions in the non-biblical manuscripts at Qumran
Title:
Contributor:
Joëlle Alhadef-Lake (author), Martin G. Abegg, Jr. (thesis supervisor), Dorothy Peters (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
During the period of the writing of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Tetragrammaton (YHWH) was so sacred that it had become an ineffable name. This thesis studies alternations in the usage of the Tetragrammaton in non-biblical manuscripts at Qumran through an analysis of scriptural quotations from the Torah to the Nevi'im in the Dead Sea Scrolls citing the Tetragrammaton. Thirty-three distinctive divine name alternations were identified. Additionally, a list of alternation types and of scrolls featuring alternations in Qumran were compiled. Distinctive groups of scrolls were identified at Qumran: some featured the Tetragrammaton, with or without alternations, and some circumvented it completely. Our study focuses on the avoidance of the Tetragrammaton, on alternations in square script, and on writing traditions: El, Tetrapuncta and paleo-Hebrew. Two applications were then investigated: the use of alternations in divine names in order to determine the scrolls' origins and the distribution of names in paleo-Hebrew in these scrolls.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
“Indeed, He is coming with the clouds” A study of Revelation 1:7-8 as the multivalent thematic statement of the Apocalypse
Title:
Contributor:
Mark A. Haukaas (author), James M. Scott (thesis supervisor), Kent D. Clarke (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Although many scholars regard Rev 1:7, 1:8, or 1:7-8 as thematic for Revelation, they have not substantiated their claim. Revelation 1:7-8, which highlights the cosmic parousia of Jesus Christ, is the multivalent thematic statement of the Apocalypse. Revelation 1:7-8 features a prominent allusion to Dan 7:13, which serves to unlock the multilayered meaning of the Apocalypse. To highlight Rev 1:7-8, the author uses such literary devices as poetry, inclusio, inclusive language, and liturgical dialogue. The author also uses chain-link interlock to connect Rev 1:7-8 with Rev 1:9-20, which is thematic. The author further links Rev 1:7-8 and Revelation 4-5 and establishes Daniel 7 as an allusion that controls these two central chapters. The author uses key words throughout Revelation 6-22 that resonate with Rev 1:7-8. With Rev 1:7-8 as the axis, the author expands the meaning of Christ's cosmic parousia in all its dimensions and ramifications.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
“You will be like the gods” : the conceptualization of deity in the Hebrew Bible in cognitive perspective
Title:
Contributor:
Daniel O. McClellan (author), Craig Broyles (thesis supervisor), Martin Abegg (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis has two primary goals: (1) to analyze the countours and extent of the generic category of deity in the Hebrew Bible, and (2) propose a semantic base for the term. It begins with a description of the fields associated with cognitive theory, and particularly cognitive linguistics. Chapter 2 examines the cognitive origins of notions of deity and discusses how this heritage is reflected within the biblical texts. The third chapter examines the conceptualization of Israel’s prototypical deity, YHWH, beginning from the earliest divine profiles detectable within the text. In Chapter 4 the discussion returns to the generic notion of deity, highlighting references within the biblical text to deities other than YHWH. The conclusion synthesizes the different sections of the thesis, sketching the origins and development of the Hebrew Bible’s representation of both prototypical and non-prototypical notions of deity. Implications for further research are then briefly discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013

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