TWU Thesis Collection

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How a story means : a narrative linguistic reading of Exodus 2-4
Title:
Contributor:
Douglas Dunbar (author), Robert Hiebert (thesis supervisor), Larry Perkins (second reader), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution), Dirk Büchner (external examiner)
Abstract:
Well-written narratives communicate more than information. What a story communicates is as important as how the story communicates. The narrative flow of a story engages the reader in the action. Narrative conventions assist the reader in connecting prior knowledge or experience with the story. Authors also make linguistic decisions as to how the story is conveyed. The syntax of clauses, sentences, paragraphs and whole documents conveys the story to the reader in expected, and at times unexpected, ways. This study merges narrative and text-linguistic exegetical methods in the reading of Exodus 2-4. Text-linguistics, the primary method employed, examines the syntax of the story in an effort to understand how the language has been employed in the communicative act. These observations are then combined with narrative observations: characterization, plot, type-scenes, and connections with other stories within the same work, in this case the Pentateuch.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
How Do Participants in an Evangelism Training Program Assess Its Impact on Their Ability and Confidence in Sharing Their Personal Faith?
Title:
Contributor:
Albert T. Y. Kwan (author), Daryl Busby (thesis supervisor), Curtis Congo (second reader), Brian Cooper (external examiner), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This research project probed the question, “How do participants in an evangelism training program assess its impact on their ability, confidence and enthusiasm in sharing their faith to non-believers?” Current research suggests that although “evangelicals” firmly believe in the exclusivism of the Gospel message, few actually tell others about this message (a practice called “witnessing to others”). However, current research also suggests that when evangelicals are trained and encouraged to tell others, their confidence and skill level in witnessing is increased. The project reviews both historical and current theological understandings of the term “evangelism”. The project also probes some of the ethical issues related to the motives and reasons for witnessing to others. The project then culminates by presenting the findings of a phenomenological study of thirty people from selected Chinese churches in Calgary who participated in a training program designed to enhance their confidence and skill in witnessing to others.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
How Parents of Children with Autism Access Service: The Recollection of Eight Families
Title:
Contributor:
Kaitlyn G Born (author), Ken Pudlas (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), David Carter (thesis supervisor), Ted Wormeli (external examiner)
Abstract:
Autism Spectrum Disorder has an increasing prevalence in children; diagnostic tools have become more refined and children are diagnosed younger. Parents of children with ASD learn to cope with challenges. It was hypothesized that many parents in the lower mainland of British Columbia are self-educating instead of learning from healthcare professionals. It was also hypothesized that parents are unaware of the resources available to them after receiving a diagnosis, and are therefore seeking help for their child and assembling services in much the same way they self-educated themselves. Eight families were interviewed about their experiences post-diagnosis. It was observed that families varied greatly in emotional response and were provided with information from a physician. However, few actually used the information provided to achieve a service assembly. This qualitative research revealed that families experience relational strain and parents desired a resources to guide, support, and educate them throughout their autism journey.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
The Impact of Three Math Interventions on Number Fact Knowledge among Elementary School Students: Emphasis on Students with Lower Math Abilities
Title:
Contributor:
Katrina Korb (thesis supervisor), Angela C. Feyter (author), Lara Ragpot (external examiner), Kenneth Pudlas (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study examined the impact of three math interventions on students with lower math abilities (LMA) in connection to their ability to gain number fact knowledge. Grade level was also used as a variable. Sixty-five students in Grades 2-6 participated in one of the following three interventions: drill-and-practice, strategy instruction and peer-mediated practice. At the end of 10 weeks, participants completed a number fact test that consisted of addition and multiplication statements. ANOVAs were used to analyze the results for each research question. Results demonstrated that the three interventions had no significant interaction effect on the number fact knowledge gained by the students with LMA. As well, students with LMA and without LMA benefitted equally from the interventions. It was also found that there was no significant interaction between the grade of the student and the intervention used. However, all students benefitted from all three interventions.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Incidental Correction of Pronunciation: Beliefs and Classroom Practice
Title:
Contributor:
Rebeka K. Delamorandiere (author), William Acton (thesis supervisor), Amanda Baker (second reader), Kay McAllister (third reader), Jennifer Foote (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Pronunciation instruction is currently being integrated into task-based English language education. However, instructors question the appropriateness of pronunciation correction, especially in a setting that focuses on meaning and content. Despite research suggesting successful techniques for correcting pronunciation, few studies explore the impact of correction in a class-based setting. In order to explore the appropriate locale for correction, this thesis describes observed instances of correction and then recounts student perspectives and instructor attitudes about correction in an academic setting. Observations show that instructors correct pronunciation errors by using primarily implicit recasts. Students desire pronunciation correction; however, they tend to be wary of interruption. Instructors believe that correction is necessary, but not if it will increase student stress and anxiety. Suggestions for effective implementation of feedback are given, including recommendations for when and how feedback could have occurred in the observed classes.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Incorporating syntax into theories of textual transmission : preliminary studies in the Judaean desert Isaiah scrolls and fragments
Title:
Contributor:
James Tucker (author), Martin Abegg (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Prior to the discovery of the Qumran and Judaean Desert scrolls and fragments, text-critical scholars conducted their investigation of textual variation by means of manuscript stemma, among which ! and its associated scribal school was the golden rule. With nearly seventy years of research now complete, scholars have emended their methodological framework to account for variation by means of the scribal practices of the Second Temple era. To analyze textual variation vis-à-vis scribal practices and approaches has required that scholars incorporate historical linguistics into existing philological methods. The linguistic categories of orthography, phonology, and morphology have received a significant amount attention, mostly in Emanuel Tov's Non-Aligned theory. However, syntax has received little attention. To test the hypothesis that syntax should likewise be incorporated into transmission theory methodology, several case studies from the Judaean Desert Isaiah corpus are presented. The conclusion of the present study affirms that syntax offers a viable method to account for the extant readings witnessed in the Judaean Desert Isaiah corpus.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Inferentialist reliabilism and proper functionalism : a comparative analysis as defenses of externalism
Title:
Contributor:
Amy Viviano (author), Myron Penner (thesis supervisor), Phillip Wiebe (second reader), Christopher Tucker (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The specific question this thesis aims to answer is this: does Jack Lyons' inferentialist reliabilism or Alvin Plantinga's proper functionalism provide a more plausible defence of externalism? This thesis compares inferentialist reliabilism and proper functionalism as external epistemic theories and evaluates them on how plausibly they answer the main objections that have been raised against externalism. This thesis begins by outlining these objections: The Generality Problem, the New Evil Demon Problem, and the Clairvoyance and Mr. Truetemp Objections. I list and defend the criteria that each theory must meet in order to provide successful solutions to these objections. Next I evaluate Lyons' and Plantinga's responses to the objections and which criteria they meet in solving the objections. Finally, I conclude after a comparison of the solutions Lyons and Plantinga give to the objections that inferentialist reliabilism provides a more plausible defence of externalism than proper functionalism does.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Integrating Attachment Processes in an Adopted Child with Lifespan Integration Therapy: A Hermeneutic Single Case Efficacy Design
Title:
Contributor:
Carlee E Lewis (author), Janelle L Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin J McDonald (second reader), Joanne Crandall (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In this study, the efficacy of Lifespan Integration therapy (LI) for addressing attachment processes with adopted children in middle childhood was investigated. A Hermeneutic Single Case Efficacy Design (Elliott, 2002, 2015) was used to gather quantitative and qualitative data from an adoptive parent-child dyad who were experiencing LI for the first time. A 12-year-old male received bi-weekly LI therapy sessions, and data was collected throughout the therapy process. The adoptive mother was used as a resource in facilitating a more secure attachment. Client change and the contribution of LI to client change were adjudicated by experts who concluded that change occurred and was due to LI. Changes in internal attachment processes and the attachment bond between the parent and child of this dyad were observed. This case provides evidence that attachment disruptions can be repaired in middle childhood and that attachment processes can be targets in interventions beyond early childhood.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Integrating Ego Identity in an Adult Third Culture Kid with Lifespan Integration Therapy: A Reflexive Hermeneutic Single Case Efficacy Design
Title:
Contributor:
Sharon M Macfarlane (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Jose Domene (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Research findings support the presence of psycho-social challenges for third culture kids (TCKs) given their characteristic lifestyle. Structured as a self-experimentation Hermeneutic Single-Case Efficacy Design (auto-HSCED), I investigated the use of Lifespan Integration (LI) therapy in addressing ego identity fragmentation as conceptualized through an Eriksonian and neo-Eriksonian model. This project sought to answer: Can LI be efficacious in addressing ego identity fragmentation in an adult TCK? Initial outcomes did not meet HSCED standards for significance, however, further investigation revealed evidence of decontextualization and reductionist therapy formulations and analysis processes. These were remediated through intersectional analysis with the use of metasynthetic principles which enabled a re-interpretation of results within a broader intersectional framework. The subsequent proposed refinement of study conclusions argued that outcomes met the threshold for significance and for demonstrating LI efficacy in producing client ego identity change. This project also provided a first-hand account of my therapeutic journey.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Intensive family therapy with at-risk youth : a preliminary critical incident study
Title:
Contributor:
Giselle Tranquilla (author), Robert Lees (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Faith Auton-Cuff (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Multisystemic Therapy (MST) has been established as an effective treatment approach to working with at-risk youth. The Intensive Family Therapy Project followed the basic tenets of MST and adapted them to a rural community setting in British Columbia. The Project was designed to work with young offenders and their families in addressing delinquent behavior from a holistic perspective. This study used the Critical Incident Technique to examine what clients found helpful and unhelpful about the treatment program. Nine interviews were conducted involving six families. Data from the interviews was classified into seven categories, 26 subcategories. Results indicate participants found involvement in the project was more helpful than hindering, as indicated by the higher rate of positive incidents. Clients' voices identified Intensive Family Therapy as a valuable treatment approach and results indicate the potential for adapted forms of MST to be applicable, relevant and effective in working with these families.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Intergenerational voices : exploring body image transmission in the mother-daughter dyad
Title:
Contributor:
Hillary Lianna Sommers McBride (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Marla Buchanan (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Due to the prevalence of body-dissatisfaction and disordered eating among North American women, this study was designed to better understand the development of young women’s healthy body image, and how their mothers may have contributed to their embodiment. Five motherdaughter dyads were selected for inclusion based on the young adult daughter’s healthy body image. In order to best understand the participants, and empower them through the telling of their own stories, the qualitative feminist method the Listening guide was employed. Through participants’ narratives, voices were identified which spoke of the body (voices of idealized femininity, silencing, functionality, acceptance, embodiment, and resistance) and of relationship (voices of comparison, differentiation, and connection). In these voices, the mother participants spoke about their mothers, themselves and their daughters, while the daughter participants spoke about their mothers, themselves and the daughters they had or imagined they may one day have. The daughters spoke most in the voices of embodiment and resistance, demonstrating how they had come to love their bodies and resist dominant cultural narratives. Mothers were found to have taught their daughters about health and stewardship of the body. The mothers were able to do this in spite of their own body-dissatisfaction. Through relational safety and connection mothers non-judgmentally supported their daughters in non-appearance related domains, while also celebrating their daughter’s beauty.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Interpretability of the Canadian Nurse Informatics Competency Assessment Scale Among Fourth-Year Nursing Students
Title:
Contributor:
Andrea E Dresselhuis (author), Dr. Rick Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Dr. Maggie Theron (second reader), Dr. Leanne Currie (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Nursing informatics merges nursing practice, its information and knowledge, with information communication technologies to improve patient care. Uptake of informatics competencies can be measured using self-perceived assessment scales. A scale for measuring Canadian nursing informatics has been recently developed from national competency indicators. In order to examine its wording and interpretability, cognitive interviewing was conducted with eight fourth-year nursing students as they completed the Canadian Nurse Informatics Competency Assessment Scale. Findings revealed issues related to misinterpreted survey items, items seen as “difficult” to answer, and specific words and phrases not recognized or misinterpreted. Furthermore, design flaws such technology-related jargon, wording ambiguity, or double-barrelled questions were revealed. Correspondingly, specific item and response re-wording revisions have been recommended to improve wording, interpretability and scale validity. Improving this scale may contribute to nursing informatics assessment and uptake in Canada which may be timely and strategic given that nursing informatics preparedness in Canada lags.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019

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