TWU Thesis Collection

Pages

Incorporating syntax into theories of textual transmission : preliminary studies in the Judaean desert Isaiah scrolls and fragments
Title:
Contributor:
James Tucker (author), Martin Abegg (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Prior to the discovery of the Qumran and Judaean Desert scrolls and fragments, text-critical scholars conducted their investigation of textual variation by means of manuscript stemma, among which ! and its associated scribal school was the golden rule. With nearly seventy years of research now complete, scholars have emended their methodological framework to account for variation by means of the scribal practices of the Second Temple era. To analyze textual variation vis-à-vis scribal practices and approaches has required that scholars incorporate historical linguistics into existing philological methods. The linguistic categories of orthography, phonology, and morphology have received a significant amount attention, mostly in Emanuel Tov's Non-Aligned theory. However, syntax has received little attention. To test the hypothesis that syntax should likewise be incorporated into transmission theory methodology, several case studies from the Judaean Desert Isaiah corpus are presented. The conclusion of the present study affirms that syntax offers a viable method to account for the extant readings witnessed in the Judaean Desert Isaiah corpus.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Inferentialist reliabilism and proper functionalism : a comparative analysis as defenses of externalism
Title:
Contributor:
Amy Viviano (author), Myron Penner (thesis supervisor), Phillip Wiebe (second reader), Christopher Tucker (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The specific question this thesis aims to answer is this: does Jack Lyons' inferentialist reliabilism or Alvin Plantinga's proper functionalism provide a more plausible defence of externalism? This thesis compares inferentialist reliabilism and proper functionalism as external epistemic theories and evaluates them on how plausibly they answer the main objections that have been raised against externalism. This thesis begins by outlining these objections: The Generality Problem, the New Evil Demon Problem, and the Clairvoyance and Mr. Truetemp Objections. I list and defend the criteria that each theory must meet in order to provide successful solutions to these objections. Next I evaluate Lyons' and Plantinga's responses to the objections and which criteria they meet in solving the objections. Finally, I conclude after a comparison of the solutions Lyons and Plantinga give to the objections that inferentialist reliabilism provides a more plausible defence of externalism than proper functionalism does.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Integrating Attachment Processes in an Adopted Child with Lifespan Integration Therapy: A Hermeneutic Single Case Efficacy Design
Title:
Contributor:
Carlee E Lewis (author), Janelle L Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin J McDonald (second reader), Joanne Crandall (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In this study, the efficacy of Lifespan Integration therapy (LI) for addressing attachment processes with adopted children in middle childhood was investigated. A Hermeneutic Single Case Efficacy Design (Elliott, 2002, 2015) was used to gather quantitative and qualitative data from an adoptive parent-child dyad who were experiencing LI for the first time. A 12-year-old male received bi-weekly LI therapy sessions, and data was collected throughout the therapy process. The adoptive mother was used as a resource in facilitating a more secure attachment. Client change and the contribution of LI to client change were adjudicated by experts who concluded that change occurred and was due to LI. Changes in internal attachment processes and the attachment bond between the parent and child of this dyad were observed. This case provides evidence that attachment disruptions can be repaired in middle childhood and that attachment processes can be targets in interventions beyond early childhood.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Integrating Ego Identity in an Adult Third Culture Kid with Lifespan Integration Therapy: A Reflexive Hermeneutic Single Case Efficacy Design
Title:
Contributor:
Sharon M Macfarlane (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Jose Domene (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Research findings support the presence of psycho-social challenges for third culture kids (TCKs) given their characteristic lifestyle. Structured as a self-experimentation Hermeneutic Single-Case Efficacy Design (auto-HSCED), I investigated the use of Lifespan Integration (LI) therapy in addressing ego identity fragmentation as conceptualized through an Eriksonian and neo-Eriksonian model. This project sought to answer: Can LI be efficacious in addressing ego identity fragmentation in an adult TCK? Initial outcomes did not meet HSCED standards for significance, however, further investigation revealed evidence of decontextualization and reductionist therapy formulations and analysis processes. These were remediated through intersectional analysis with the use of metasynthetic principles which enabled a re-interpretation of results within a broader intersectional framework. The subsequent proposed refinement of study conclusions argued that outcomes met the threshold for significance and for demonstrating LI efficacy in producing client ego identity change. This project also provided a first-hand account of my therapeutic journey.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Intensive family therapy with at-risk youth : a preliminary critical incident study
Title:
Contributor:
Giselle Tranquilla (author), Robert Lees (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Faith Auton-Cuff (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Multisystemic Therapy (MST) has been established as an effective treatment approach to working with at-risk youth. The Intensive Family Therapy Project followed the basic tenets of MST and adapted them to a rural community setting in British Columbia. The Project was designed to work with young offenders and their families in addressing delinquent behavior from a holistic perspective. This study used the Critical Incident Technique to examine what clients found helpful and unhelpful about the treatment program. Nine interviews were conducted involving six families. Data from the interviews was classified into seven categories, 26 subcategories. Results indicate participants found involvement in the project was more helpful than hindering, as indicated by the higher rate of positive incidents. Clients' voices identified Intensive Family Therapy as a valuable treatment approach and results indicate the potential for adapted forms of MST to be applicable, relevant and effective in working with these families.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Intergenerational voices : exploring body image transmission in the mother-daughter dyad
Title:
Contributor:
Hillary Lianna Sommers McBride (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Marla Buchanan (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Due to the prevalence of body-dissatisfaction and disordered eating among North American women, this study was designed to better understand the development of young women’s healthy body image, and how their mothers may have contributed to their embodiment. Five motherdaughter dyads were selected for inclusion based on the young adult daughter’s healthy body image. In order to best understand the participants, and empower them through the telling of their own stories, the qualitative feminist method the Listening guide was employed. Through participants’ narratives, voices were identified which spoke of the body (voices of idealized femininity, silencing, functionality, acceptance, embodiment, and resistance) and of relationship (voices of comparison, differentiation, and connection). In these voices, the mother participants spoke about their mothers, themselves and their daughters, while the daughter participants spoke about their mothers, themselves and the daughters they had or imagined they may one day have. The daughters spoke most in the voices of embodiment and resistance, demonstrating how they had come to love their bodies and resist dominant cultural narratives. Mothers were found to have taught their daughters about health and stewardship of the body. The mothers were able to do this in spite of their own body-dissatisfaction. Through relational safety and connection mothers non-judgmentally supported their daughters in non-appearance related domains, while also celebrating their daughter’s beauty.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Interpretability of the Canadian Nurse Informatics Competency Assessment Scale Among Fourth-Year Nursing Students
Title:
Contributor:
Andrea E Dresselhuis (author), Dr. Rick Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Dr. Maggie Theron (second reader), Dr. Leanne Currie (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Nursing informatics merges nursing practice, its information and knowledge, with information communication technologies to improve patient care. Uptake of informatics competencies can be measured using self-perceived assessment scales. A scale for measuring Canadian nursing informatics has been recently developed from national competency indicators. In order to examine its wording and interpretability, cognitive interviewing was conducted with eight fourth-year nursing students as they completed the Canadian Nurse Informatics Competency Assessment Scale. Findings revealed issues related to misinterpreted survey items, items seen as “difficult” to answer, and specific words and phrases not recognized or misinterpreted. Furthermore, design flaws such technology-related jargon, wording ambiguity, or double-barrelled questions were revealed. Correspondingly, specific item and response re-wording revisions have been recommended to improve wording, interpretability and scale validity. Improving this scale may contribute to nursing informatics assessment and uptake in Canada which may be timely and strategic given that nursing informatics preparedness in Canada lags.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Investigation of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale’s Questions in the Screening of Postpartum Depression in Men
Title:
Contributor:
Asha R. Parmar (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Maggie Theron (second reader), Reina van Lagen (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study was designed to investigate whether the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), which is widely used to screen for PPD in women, is an appropriate tool for men. Six men in their first year postpartum were interviewed between January 2013 and June 2013. The participating men were from a small northern community in the Peace Country region of Alberta. In order to understand how men interpreted the EPDS, cognitive interviews were conducted following guidelines by Willis (2005) to examine the following four cognitive methods of retrieval: comprehension, decision making, memory recall, and response making. The findings provided valuable information regarding the use of the EPDS to screen for paternal PPD. It is recommended that nurses consider men’s interpretations of the EPDS questions as part of the PPD screening. Further research is needed to determine appropriate EPDS cutoff scores for men in the postpartum period and the use of the EPDS in different populations.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Involking silvern voices in healthcare : transforming practice by engaging older adults in collaborative partnerships
Title:
Contributor:
Stacy L. Oke (author), Faith Richardson (thesis supervisor), Deborah Gibson (second reader), Kristi Panchuk (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Canada's population is aging. This growing trend will ultimately have an impact on nursing practice as older individuals continue to seek healthcare services. Nurses must be able to work in collaboration with the older population to provide quality care. This action research study explored participative healthcare from an older adult's perspective. This study revealed that older adults prefer to be active participants in their care. The major theme that emerged was true partnership. Three sub-themes that emerged were communication, respect, and trust. These three sub-themes work in unity to contribute to a healthcare experience that exemplifies true partnerships. This study proposes a definition of true partnership as being open to and inviting mutual communication in an atmosphere that encourages equity sharing of information contributing to respect and the development of trust that results in confident collaboration in care.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Is nursing transferable and portable : the experiences of travel nurses
Title:
Contributor:
Rae Ramsden (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Lynn Van Hofwegen (second reader), Barb Astle (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study was designed to help us better understand the question of portability and transferability of the Nursing profession by examining the experiences of six travel nurses. The travel nurses described ways in which they believed their skills and practice standards transferred between countries supporting portability and transferability. This study was conducted in the United States Southwest during the period between October 2013 and March 2014. The interviews were recorded with English speaking travel nurses who had international work experience within the countries of Australia, Canada, England and the United States of America. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed following the interpretive descriptive qualitative design methodology by Thorne (2008). The findings revealed the following five themes: (1) ability to transfer skills; (2) navigating policy differences; (3) overcoming English language differences; (4) acculturation, transitioning into new locations; and, (5) becoming aware of healthcare costs.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Jewish monotheism : the exclusivity of Yahweh in Persian period Yehud (539-333 BCE)
Title:
Contributor:
Abel Sitali (author), Kent Clarke (thesis supervisor), Dirk Buchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Studies about the origin of monotheism—the belief in one god while denying the existence of all others, have continued to be a matter of debate among Hebrew Bible scholars. The debate has often fallen into two contrasting categories. On the one hand, there are those who argue for an early origin in which it is posited that monotheism must have begun somewhere between the time of Moses and the monarchical period. On the other hand, others have argued for a late date which stretches from the exilic period to the Persian period. In spite of the different explanations given by the proponents of early monotheism, this thesis builds on the hypothesis that exclusive monotheism was only realized during the Persian period. The monotheistic rhetoric that characterized the message of Deutero-Isaiah, only came to be put into practice by the confessional community of faith among the returning exiles in Yehud.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Job stress and turnover among registered nurses in acute care : a regression analysis
Title:
Contributor:
Carolyn Klassen (author), Rick Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Angela Wolff (thesis supervisor), Karen Jonson (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Nurse turnover needs further exploration in the Canadian experience. This study’s purpose was to examine whether job stress, as indicated by burnout and psychological distress, explains turnover among acute care registered nurses. The research questions were: To what extent does job stress explain nurses’ intent or likelihood of leaving their position or the nursing profession? What other factors, over and above job stress, explain nurses’ intent or likelihood of leaving their position and the nursing profession? This secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data from 522 acute care registered nurses in British Columbia was analyzed using ordinal logistic regression. Burnout, specifically emotional exhaustion, was consistently predictive of both intent and likelihood to leave the profession and the position. Emotionally exhausted nurses are two times more likely to have intent to leave the profession and 1.5 times more likely to do so. The other factors played a minimal role in explaining turnover.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013

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