TWU Thesis Collection

Pages

Investigation of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale’s Questions in the Screening of Postpartum Depression in Men
Title:
Contributor:
Asha R. Parmar (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Maggie Theron (second reader), Reina van Lagen (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study was designed to investigate whether the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), which is widely used to screen for PPD in women, is an appropriate tool for men. Six men in their first year postpartum were interviewed between January 2013 and June 2013. The participating men were from a small northern community in the Peace Country region of Alberta. In order to understand how men interpreted the EPDS, cognitive interviews were conducted following guidelines by Willis (2005) to examine the following four cognitive methods of retrieval: comprehension, decision making, memory recall, and response making. The findings provided valuable information regarding the use of the EPDS to screen for paternal PPD. It is recommended that nurses consider men’s interpretations of the EPDS questions as part of the PPD screening. Further research is needed to determine appropriate EPDS cutoff scores for men in the postpartum period and the use of the EPDS in different populations.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Involking silvern voices in healthcare : transforming practice by engaging older adults in collaborative partnerships
Title:
Contributor:
Stacy L. Oke (author), Faith Richardson (thesis supervisor), Deborah Gibson (second reader), Kristi Panchuk (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Canada's population is aging. This growing trend will ultimately have an impact on nursing practice as older individuals continue to seek healthcare services. Nurses must be able to work in collaboration with the older population to provide quality care. This action research study explored participative healthcare from an older adult's perspective. This study revealed that older adults prefer to be active participants in their care. The major theme that emerged was true partnership. Three sub-themes that emerged were communication, respect, and trust. These three sub-themes work in unity to contribute to a healthcare experience that exemplifies true partnerships. This study proposes a definition of true partnership as being open to and inviting mutual communication in an atmosphere that encourages equity sharing of information contributing to respect and the development of trust that results in confident collaboration in care.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Is nursing transferable and portable : the experiences of travel nurses
Title:
Contributor:
Rae Ramsden (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Lynn Van Hofwegen (second reader), Barb Astle (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study was designed to help us better understand the question of portability and transferability of the Nursing profession by examining the experiences of six travel nurses. The travel nurses described ways in which they believed their skills and practice standards transferred between countries supporting portability and transferability. This study was conducted in the United States Southwest during the period between October 2013 and March 2014. The interviews were recorded with English speaking travel nurses who had international work experience within the countries of Australia, Canada, England and the United States of America. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed following the interpretive descriptive qualitative design methodology by Thorne (2008). The findings revealed the following five themes: (1) ability to transfer skills; (2) navigating policy differences; (3) overcoming English language differences; (4) acculturation, transitioning into new locations; and, (5) becoming aware of healthcare costs.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Jewish monotheism : the exclusivity of Yahweh in Persian period Yehud (539-333 BCE)
Title:
Contributor:
Abel Sitali (author), Kent Clarke (thesis supervisor), Dirk Buchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Studies about the origin of monotheism—the belief in one god while denying the existence of all others, have continued to be a matter of debate among Hebrew Bible scholars. The debate has often fallen into two contrasting categories. On the one hand, there are those who argue for an early origin in which it is posited that monotheism must have begun somewhere between the time of Moses and the monarchical period. On the other hand, others have argued for a late date which stretches from the exilic period to the Persian period. In spite of the different explanations given by the proponents of early monotheism, this thesis builds on the hypothesis that exclusive monotheism was only realized during the Persian period. The monotheistic rhetoric that characterized the message of Deutero-Isaiah, only came to be put into practice by the confessional community of faith among the returning exiles in Yehud.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Job stress and turnover among registered nurses in acute care : a regression analysis
Title:
Contributor:
Carolyn Klassen (author), Rick Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Angela Wolff (thesis supervisor), Karen Jonson (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Nurse turnover needs further exploration in the Canadian experience. This study’s purpose was to examine whether job stress, as indicated by burnout and psychological distress, explains turnover among acute care registered nurses. The research questions were: To what extent does job stress explain nurses’ intent or likelihood of leaving their position or the nursing profession? What other factors, over and above job stress, explain nurses’ intent or likelihood of leaving their position and the nursing profession? This secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data from 522 acute care registered nurses in British Columbia was analyzed using ordinal logistic regression. Burnout, specifically emotional exhaustion, was consistently predictive of both intent and likelihood to leave the profession and the position. Emotionally exhausted nurses are two times more likely to have intent to leave the profession and 1.5 times more likely to do so. The other factors played a minimal role in explaining turnover.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
A journey with self-compassion : exploring self-compassion within the context of the Christian faith
Title:
Contributor:
Genevieve Kalnins (author), Derrick Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Janelle Kwee (second reader), Terry L. Gall (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Despite the spiritual roots of self-compassion, the impact of spirituality on the development of self-compassion has not been widely explored. The listening guide method and autoethnography were combined to explore the lived experience of self-compassion from a Christian faith perspective. The participant co-researchers’ narratives revealed three categories of voices. The voices of shame and criticism included oppression, internalized oppression, and judgment. These voices appeared as the participants discussed what makes self-compassion difficult. The voices of love and acceptance included connection, unity, openness, and warmth. Together, these voices were used as participants discussed their experiences of self-compassion. Finally, the voices of resistance included the voices of struggle and advocacy. These voices appeared to facilitate the development of self-compassion. This study offers a deeper understanding of the natural development of self-compassion and of how the Christian faith may facilitate or hinder self-compassion. Implications for counsellors, pastors, and future research are discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
The Kilburn connection : public health nursing education and the child guidance clinics in British Columbia 1932-1950
Title:
Contributor:
Melissa Suzuki (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Geertje Boschma (second reader), Barbara Astle (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Mental Hygiene emphasized mental illness prevention and mental health promotion. In British Columbia, Child Guidance Clinics (CGC) were established to promote mental hygiene among children. This study draws from institutional records on the CGC from Riverview Hospital archives (1932-1950). Using nurse and social worker Josephine Kilburn as a central figure, it explores linkages between the CGCs and public health nursing education at UBC, as well as the role of nursing in the mental hygiene movement. The study highlights how nursing has been taken for granted in the mental hygiene movement, as well as how nursing and social work identities were interconnected. Josephine Kilburn found ways to use both her nursing and social work identities to advantage, working across institutional boundaries at the CGC and UBC School of Nursing. Working within established social hierarchies Kilburn’s work reveals changing priorities and approaches to mental health over the course of twenty years.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
The Labyrinth of Grief: A Phenomenological Exploration of Turning Toward Loss
Title:
Contributor:
Janelle K. Drisner (author), Derrick W. Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Mihaela S. Launeanu (second reader), Darcy Harris (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explored the Existential Analytic grieving activity of turning toward loss. Four women, each bereaved of either a parent, spouse, child, or sibling, participated in one hour interviews. The research question was, “what is the lived experience of turning toward loss?” To understand how participants encountered and engaged with their grief, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was employed. Through lived experience descriptions, eight thematic meaning structures were revealed: (a) encounter with death, (b) surrendering to grief, (c) choosing community, (d) permitting and pursuing grief, (e) transformation of self, (f) rooting in relationship, (g) embracing life, and (h) ground of faith. From the thematic meanings emerged the metaphor of a labyrinth of grief, which symbolized the various paradoxes of grieving, signifying that turning toward loss was essentially spiritual and transformative. In describing how they turned toward their losses, the participants highlighted the inherent relational and dialogical nature of grieving.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Language Variation in Western Amman
Title:
Contributor:
Haya E Fadda (author), Hassan Abdel-Jawad (second reader), Dave Jeffery (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Sean Allison (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
The present study investigates two forms of language variation in Ammani Arabic: Qaf variation and Arabic-English code-switching. After discussing the formation of the dialect of Amman and identifying the input dialects, I address the following questions related to the first form of language variation- Qaf variation: (a) whether a change from the traditional Jordanian [g] to the urban Palestinian [ʔ] is taking place in the city and is on its way to completion in the speech of both genders; (b) what the uses of [q] are and (c) why there is an increase in its use as a variable. As for the second form of language variation- code-switching, I investigate the functions of code-switching in the speech of millennials in Amman and their frequencies based on gender.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
The "Law of the Land" in the Land of Lagides: A Comparative Analysis of Exodus 21:1-32
Title:
Contributor:
Joel F. Korytko (author), Larry J. Perkins (thesis supervisor), Robert J. V. Hiebert (second reader), Dirk Büchner (external examiner), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Septuagint Exodus has long been recognized as an outlier when it comes to the general rigidity and stereotypical translation practices found in other books within the LXX corpus. The general freedom exhibited by the translator, though expressed within careful limits, is well-documented when it comes to grammatical, syntactical, and lexicographical evaluations. This thesis, while engaging in the descriptive analysis of these topics, is also directed towards a new type of synthesis: a comparison of the translation with Ptolemaic legal norms. It is due to the idiosyncrasies and anomalies arising from a translation-technical analysis that the question is asked, “Could these differences be accounted for by consulting Greek legal and societal standards?” With respect to Exodus 21.1-32, the answer in many cases is, “Yes.” This study demarcates these potential influences on a verse by verse basis after briefly identifying the broader legal structures and forces at play in Ptolemaic Egypt.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Lessons from the red nose : what nurses can learn from therapeutic clowns
Title:
Contributor:
Sandra Graham (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Landa Terblanche (second reader), Joan Boyce (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In this qualitative study, seven participants from two volunteer therapeutic clown troupes were interviewed about their experiences in order to discover how clowns and clowning techniques can inform nursing practice, specifically in the art of relationship. Clowning emerged as a complex art, combining the visual elements of the costume, make-up and props with ubiquitous humour, laced with sensitivity and compassion. Participants described having a vocation for clowning, with intrinsic motivation and passion. They articulated how their clown costumes and personas provided emotional shielding, giving them protection from – while also allowing entrance into – emotionally difficult situations. They also used judicious humour, intuiting when, where and how best to use humour in myriad patient situations in a way that brought relief to patients and families. Insights from clowning can help nurses to expand their relational art: In patient settings, when used judiciously, there may be no place where humour is off limits.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Leveraging church culture : how understanding a church’s culture enhances ministry and community engagement
Title:
Contributor:
Michael Mawhorter (author), Lyle Schrag (thesis supervisor), Archie Spencer (second reader), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution), Randy Wollf (third reader)
Abstract:
This study looked at organizational culture in a church context, exploring whether understanding and leveraging a church's culture helps focus ministry and maximizes effectiveness. The research used What Is Your Church's Personality, by Philip D. Douglass, in the ministry context of Ladner Baptist Church, Ladner B.C. There were three components to the research: 1. Thirty-five opinion leaders in the congregation took a personality survey with results plotted on a wheel of eight church personalities. 2. A meeting to report the results, with opportunity for feedback and discussion. 3. A follow up interview to assess whether the leadership found this process helpful in understanding their culture and leveraging it for greater effectiveness in ministry and outreach. The result of this project demonstrated that the survey accurately identified the church's personality and the supplemental material on each personality gave valuable insights into how to leverage that culture for greater effectiveness.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015

Pages