TWU Thesis Collection

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A journey with self-compassion : exploring self-compassion within the context of the Christian faith
Title:
Contributor:
Genevieve Kalnins (author), Derrick Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Janelle Kwee (second reader), Terry L. Gall (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Despite the spiritual roots of self-compassion, the impact of spirituality on the development of self-compassion has not been widely explored. The listening guide method and autoethnography were combined to explore the lived experience of self-compassion from a Christian faith perspective. The participant co-researchers’ narratives revealed three categories of voices. The voices of shame and criticism included oppression, internalized oppression, and judgment. These voices appeared as the participants discussed what makes self-compassion difficult. The voices of love and acceptance included connection, unity, openness, and warmth. Together, these voices were used as participants discussed their experiences of self-compassion. Finally, the voices of resistance included the voices of struggle and advocacy. These voices appeared to facilitate the development of self-compassion. This study offers a deeper understanding of the natural development of self-compassion and of how the Christian faith may facilitate or hinder self-compassion. Implications for counsellors, pastors, and future research are discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
The Kilburn connection : public health nursing education and the child guidance clinics in British Columbia 1932-1950
Title:
Contributor:
Melissa Suzuki (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Geertje Boschma (second reader), Barbara Astle (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Mental Hygiene emphasized mental illness prevention and mental health promotion. In British Columbia, Child Guidance Clinics (CGC) were established to promote mental hygiene among children. This study draws from institutional records on the CGC from Riverview Hospital archives (1932-1950). Using nurse and social worker Josephine Kilburn as a central figure, it explores linkages between the CGCs and public health nursing education at UBC, as well as the role of nursing in the mental hygiene movement. The study highlights how nursing has been taken for granted in the mental hygiene movement, as well as how nursing and social work identities were interconnected. Josephine Kilburn found ways to use both her nursing and social work identities to advantage, working across institutional boundaries at the CGC and UBC School of Nursing. Working within established social hierarchies Kilburn’s work reveals changing priorities and approaches to mental health over the course of twenty years.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
The Labyrinth of Grief: A Phenomenological Exploration of Turning Toward Loss
Title:
Contributor:
Janelle K. Drisner (author), Derrick W. Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Mihaela S. Launeanu (second reader), Darcy Harris (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explored the Existential Analytic grieving activity of turning toward loss. Four women, each bereaved of either a parent, spouse, child, or sibling, participated in one hour interviews. The research question was, “what is the lived experience of turning toward loss?” To understand how participants encountered and engaged with their grief, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was employed. Through lived experience descriptions, eight thematic meaning structures were revealed: (a) encounter with death, (b) surrendering to grief, (c) choosing community, (d) permitting and pursuing grief, (e) transformation of self, (f) rooting in relationship, (g) embracing life, and (h) ground of faith. From the thematic meanings emerged the metaphor of a labyrinth of grief, which symbolized the various paradoxes of grieving, signifying that turning toward loss was essentially spiritual and transformative. In describing how they turned toward their losses, the participants highlighted the inherent relational and dialogical nature of grieving.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Language Variation in Western Amman
Title:
Contributor:
Haya E Fadda (author), Hassan Abdel-Jawad (second reader), Dave Jeffery (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Sean Allison (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
The present study investigates two forms of language variation in Ammani Arabic: Qaf variation and Arabic-English code-switching. After discussing the formation of the dialect of Amman and identifying the input dialects, I address the following questions related to the first form of language variation- Qaf variation: (a) whether a change from the traditional Jordanian [g] to the urban Palestinian [ʔ] is taking place in the city and is on its way to completion in the speech of both genders; (b) what the uses of [q] are and (c) why there is an increase in its use as a variable. As for the second form of language variation- code-switching, I investigate the functions of code-switching in the speech of millennials in Amman and their frequencies based on gender.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
The "Law of the Land" in the Land of Lagides: A Comparative Analysis of Exodus 21:1-32
Title:
Contributor:
Joel F. Korytko (author), Larry J. Perkins (thesis supervisor), Robert J. V. Hiebert (second reader), Dirk Büchner (external examiner), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Septuagint Exodus has long been recognized as an outlier when it comes to the general rigidity and stereotypical translation practices found in other books within the LXX corpus. The general freedom exhibited by the translator, though expressed within careful limits, is well-documented when it comes to grammatical, syntactical, and lexicographical evaluations. This thesis, while engaging in the descriptive analysis of these topics, is also directed towards a new type of synthesis: a comparison of the translation with Ptolemaic legal norms. It is due to the idiosyncrasies and anomalies arising from a translation-technical analysis that the question is asked, “Could these differences be accounted for by consulting Greek legal and societal standards?” With respect to Exodus 21.1-32, the answer in many cases is, “Yes.” This study demarcates these potential influences on a verse by verse basis after briefly identifying the broader legal structures and forces at play in Ptolemaic Egypt.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Lessons from the red nose : what nurses can learn from therapeutic clowns
Title:
Contributor:
Sandra Graham (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Landa Terblanche (second reader), Joan Boyce (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In this qualitative study, seven participants from two volunteer therapeutic clown troupes were interviewed about their experiences in order to discover how clowns and clowning techniques can inform nursing practice, specifically in the art of relationship. Clowning emerged as a complex art, combining the visual elements of the costume, make-up and props with ubiquitous humour, laced with sensitivity and compassion. Participants described having a vocation for clowning, with intrinsic motivation and passion. They articulated how their clown costumes and personas provided emotional shielding, giving them protection from – while also allowing entrance into – emotionally difficult situations. They also used judicious humour, intuiting when, where and how best to use humour in myriad patient situations in a way that brought relief to patients and families. Insights from clowning can help nurses to expand their relational art: In patient settings, when used judiciously, there may be no place where humour is off limits.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Leveraging church culture : how understanding a church’s culture enhances ministry and community engagement
Title:
Contributor:
Michael Mawhorter (author), Lyle Schrag (thesis supervisor), Archie Spencer (second reader), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution), Randy Wollf (third reader)
Abstract:
This study looked at organizational culture in a church context, exploring whether understanding and leveraging a church's culture helps focus ministry and maximizes effectiveness. The research used What Is Your Church's Personality, by Philip D. Douglass, in the ministry context of Ladner Baptist Church, Ladner B.C. There were three components to the research: 1. Thirty-five opinion leaders in the congregation took a personality survey with results plotted on a wheel of eight church personalities. 2. A meeting to report the results, with opportunity for feedback and discussion. 3. A follow up interview to assess whether the leadership found this process helpful in understanding their culture and leveraging it for greater effectiveness in ministry and outreach. The result of this project demonstrated that the survey accurately identified the church's personality and the supplemental material on each personality gave valuable insights into how to leverage that culture for greater effectiveness.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Liberating Reason Through Tradition : A Hermeneutic Critique of the Subjective-Objective Dichotomy and Its Implications for Christianity
Title:
Contributor:
Zarchary Porcu (author), Jens Zimmermann (thesis supervisor), Grant Havers (second reader), Robert Doede (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The Enlightenment’s pursuit of verification pushed all knowledge into two categories: the objective and the subjective. Following this starting point, I argue for three things: First, that the Reformation movement is essentially conducted in the same spirit and with the same result as the Enlightenment: a push towards a certain kind of verifiability that ends up creating the same dichotomy between objective and subjective. Second, that the way to liberate reason from these problematic categories is to turn to Gadamer and the hermeneutic movement to re-contextualize and re-define how reason is used to acquire knowledge in light of our experience of it. Finally, that Eastern Orthodoxy provides a strong model for a Christianity animated by these hermeneutical principles, and further, that sacramental theology takes Gadamer's idea of truth as indwelling to its next logical step.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Life Satisfaction and Associated Predictors in An Older Adult Population
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Contributor:
Gwendolyn M. Williams (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Angela C. Wolff (second reader), Marvin Mc Donald (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Older adults are increasing in numbers worldwide. Life satisfaction, a component of subjective wellbeing, is believed to be indicative of successful aging and longevity in older adults. The aim of this investigation was to explore socio-demographic, social support, and health-related factors explaining life satisfaction among community dwelling older adults. An ordinal logistic regression was conducted on data collected by the Canadian Community Health Survey 2015-2016 (N = 2678). Older men had higher life satisfaction, as did those attaining secondary school education. The factors explaining life satisfaction were perceived general and mental health, perceived life stress, having a strong sense of belonging to a local community, and physical activity. This result indicates that emphasizing healthy lifestyle practices earlier in life and keeping older adults active and socially engaged could increase and ensure satisfaction with life as people age. In designing, implementing, and evaluating care, clinicians should consider and utilize this construct.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2020
Lifespan Integration Efficacy: A Mixed Methods Multiple Case Study
Title:
Contributor:
Monica Hu (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Attachment theory and neurobiological research have much to say about the etiology and dynamics of psychological distress. Lifespan Integration (LI) therapy was developed by Peggy Pace (2003/2012) through years of treating adults with histories of childhood abuse and trauma. Since 2003 over one thousand clinicians have been trained in LI worldwide. Growing anecdotal reports of success call for research into LI's efficacy. A rigourous, adjudicated case study research design (Hermeneutic Single Case Efficacy Design, HSCED, Elliott, 2001, 2002) was expanded to accommodate three cases. In addition to the question of efficacy, whether and how LI protocols would be linked with the underlying theory via support in the data was also investigated. The results indicate that each of the three participants experienced significant clinical change and that there was alignment with theory supporting the claim that LI works to foster integration and other markers associated with higher functioning and mental health.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Lifespan integration therapy with trauma-exposed children : a hermeneutic single case efficacy study
Title:
Contributor:
Christian Rensch (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Susan Stephen (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Trauma in children is a devastating reality with immense psychological impact on the child. Numbers indicate that millions of children experience trauma every year. Outcome research therapy with trauma-exposed children is scarce and mostly focuses on cognitive and behavioural changes. Anecdotal evidence suggests that Lifespan Integration (LI) therapy integrates traumatic experiences into other life experiences leaving them feeling more congruent and renewed. In this research study, we investigate the efficacy of Lifespan Integration with children by means of careful examination of one participant. We applied Robert Elliott’s Hermeneutic Single Case Efficacy Research Design (2002, 2014), which uses quantitative and qualitative data to argue for and against therapy efficacy. The 12-year-old research participant received 8 sessions of LI over three months, and data was collected before, throughout, and after therapy. The extent of the client’s change over the course of therapy was investigated, as well as LI’s contribution to the change, and what parts of LI were most helpful in bringing about change. Findings indicate that the client changed substantially over the course of therapy with lasting effects at follow-up, LI was substantially responsible for this change, and the timeline as an LI specific modality helped to bring this change. Details about trauma-exposed children, the theoretical underpinnings of LI, a detailed description of the HSCED procedure, as well as further directions of LI and HSCED are discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
The lived experience of learning psychomotor nursing skills
Title:
Contributor:
Anne Marie Redmond (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Mark Pijl-Zieber (second reader), Darlaine Jantzen (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Psychomotor skills are an integral component of the knowledge, attitude, and skills of nursing education. Using van Manen's approach to phenomenology (1997; 2006), this project explored third year nursing students' "lived experiences" of learning psychomotor skills. The aim of the study was to reveal how "learning to care" might be embedded in the process of learning psychomotor skills, based on the assumption that "caring" is a present but elusive concept in the experience. Data provided some fresh understandings of nursing pedagogy. The students' memorable learning experiences revealed a learning anxiety arising from the knowledge that a person will be the recipient of their care. This anxiety is present in different ways in the skills lab and clinical setting. In addition, students' experiences revealed caring through empathy, relationships, advocacy, integrating, affecting patient outcomes, and professional behaviors. These themes resonate with Roach's theory (2002) of caring as a human mode of being.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013

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