TWU Thesis Collection

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Moral Motivation: A Survey of Attempts to Understand the Motivational Qualities of Moral Judgments
Title:
Contributor:
David E. Hill (author), Myron Penner (thesis supervisor), Phillip Wiebe (second reader), Bob Doede (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Moral judgments and moral action cannot be separated. Whether realist, anti-realist or hybrid, all agree that when a moral judgment is made, motivation to act on that judgment follows. Uncovering the nature and origin of this phenomenon will be invaluable to metaethical advancement, and will also help to shape people’s understanding and expectations of moral action from one another. This paper will explore and evaluate some of the best arguments anti-realists and hybrid theorists argue for, framing the metaethical debate in light of both current empirical and philosophical work. The general question for this thesis will be, “Which stream of thought provides the best account for the phenomenon of moral motivation?” More specifically, I will be arguing in the negative as to whether or not anti-realist and hybrid views successfully avoid significant weaknesses of their own in attempts to develop plausible theories.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Negation Patterns in the Kwa Language Group
Title:
Contributor:
Lauren E Schneider (author), Sean Allison (thesis supervisor), Steve Nicolle (second reader), Roderic Casali (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Keith Snider (second reader)
Abstract:
There is extensive literature written on negation but only recently have studies begun to expand outside of the scope of Indo-European languages. Linguists are finding that certain patterns thought to be cross-linguistic are largely unattested outside this most heavily studied language family. The intent of this thesis is to survey the negation strategies in a collection of Kwa (Niger-Congo) languages to contribute to the literature on negation. Commonly cited patterns such as Jespersen’s cycle (Jespersen 1917) are almost entirely unattested in Kwa. There is a consistent pattern of marking negation in Akan, Ewe, and the North Guang languages involving the use of a preverbal nasal morpheme. Interestingly three South Guang languages utilize instead a verbal prefix bÉ-. The Ga-Dangme languages stand out in their use of verbal suffixes rather than prefixes. The Ghana-Togo Mountain subgroup of the Kwa language group also does not rely on preverbal nasal negation marking.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
A new edition of Codex I (016) : the Washington manuscript of the epistles of Paul
Title:
Contributor:
Justin Soderquist (author), Kent Clarke (thesis supervisor), Thomas Wayment (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Nearly a century has passed since Henry A. Sanders first published his editio princeps of the Washington Manuscript of the Epistles of Paul (Codex I or 016). Within that time, it has received very little scholarly attention. This new edition provides a fresh, conservative transcription based on two new image sets, and identifies all differences between the new transcription and Sanders. It additionally provides comprehensive lists of variants between Codex I, the Nestle-Aland 28th, and the Robinson Pierpont editions of the Greek New Testament. The new edition also provides valuable data surrounding the manuscript’s provenance, character, scribal habits, textual affiliation, and substantive variants. Several corrections to Sanders are offered, and the new transcription shows the effects of nearly a century upon the manuscript. This work seeks both to update Sanders, and to provide valuable data which will make the text of Codex I more readily accessible for future inquiry.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
No faithful oaths : a comparison of Esau’s speech in Jubilees 37:18-23 with Achilles’ speech in Iliad 22.260-272
Title:
Contributor:
James Hamrick (author), James Scott (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Since the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the mid-twentieth century scholars have made significant progress in understanding the Book of Jubilees, yet very little work has been done exploring this composition within its broader non-Jewish Hellenistic literary and cultural context. The handful of studies that have addressed this issue show that Jubilees was conversant with Greek intellectual traditions, demonstrating the potential fruitfulness of this area of research and the need to explore it further. This thesis attempts a modest contribution to this task by examining Esau's speech to Jacob in Jubilees 37:18-23 in light of Achilles' speech to Hector in Iliad 22:260-272. This comparison reveals that Esau’s speech exhibits notable similarities to Achilles’ speech in literary setting, rhetorical purpose, rhetorical mechanism, use of imagery, syntax, vocabulary, and characterization. These similarities are best explained as the result of the author of Jubilees intentionally adopting and adapting elements of the Iliad for his own purposes.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Non-spatial setting in white Hmong
Title:
Contributor:
Nathan M. White (author), Sean Allison (thesis supervisor), Kenneth Gregersen (second reader), Ken Manson (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Dixon (2010a,b, 2012) presents an excellent introduction to a framework for documenting a language's grammar. One portion of this is Non-spatial Setting, i.e., the grammatical marking of time, aspect, and other material. The aim of this thesis is to apply this portion of Dixon's framework to White Hmong (Hmong-Mien, Laos). The thesis first looks at typologically similar languages from the region, considers the nature of grammaticalization, and then discusses the Non-spatial Setting system of White Hmong itself. It is found that White Hmong possesses a system that includes Lexical Time Words, positive and negative Irrealis intertwined with a system of Modality, Degree of Certainty markers, and a group of Phase of Activity-marking verbs. There are five Completion morphemes--three Perfect and two Imperfect--and two Completion-marking strategies. Finally, there is one Speed morpheme that marks slowness. Some implications for Non-spatial Setting in general are also briefly discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Northern Psalms in Southern Contexts: Defining a Historical Setting for the Psalms of Asaph
Title:
Contributor:
Spencer J Elliott (author), Craig C Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The psalms of Asaph (50, 73-83) present an intriguing problem for their interpreters. Though these psalms show every sign of being used in the temple at Jerusalem, they contain a ponderous amount of traditions, geographic references, and names that would be more appropriate in Israel’s northern kingdom. The haphazard geographic and tradition-history provenance of these psalms is best reconciled by assuming a fundamental mixture between northern and southern material in the growing and cosmopolitan city of pre-exilic Jerusalem, beginning in the time of Hezekiah. As northern psalmists moved to Jerusalem after the conquests of the Assyrian empire in the late 8th c. BCE, they brought their traditions of worship and assimilated these traditions within the liturgies of Jerusalem’s temple. These psalms illumine how northern Israelites accommodated to their new Jerusalemite setting after 722 BCE, and how their psalms reflect their experience of forced displacement.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
On moral objectivity : can there be objective moral evaluation without invoking the existence of “queer” ontological properties?
Title:
Contributor:
Esther J. Devries (author), Phillip Wiebe (thesis supervisor), Robert Doede (second reader), Myron Penner (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
J.L Mackie, defender of the moral-error-theory, argues that to claim the existence of objective moral facts implies moral properties with inbuilt "to-be-pursuedness" - they would have to be intrinsically motivational. Since we do not know of the existence of any such properties, he argues that moral facts are "queer" things. I examine the positions of moral realists and anti-realists pointing out that it seems that one must either assert the existence of "queer" moral properties, or reject the truth functionality of categorical imperatives. After exploring the thought of Hilary Putnam and Emmanuel Levinas, I suggest an alternative explanation of the human moral experience that is free of "queer" moral properties. In this way, I believe to offer a more adequate explanation of human morality that defeats the false dilemma created by Mackie.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Parenting Coordination: Helping and Hindering Factors in the Resolution of Conflict in the Child's Best Interest.
Title:
Contributor:
Marianne C. Cottingham (author), Marvin J. McDonald (thesis supervisor), Bart Begalka (second reader), Jeff Chang (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the factors in parenting coordination that helped or hindered the successful resolution of family conflict in the child’s best interests. The role of the parenting coordinator (PC) is a hybrid role that combines psychology, conflict resolution, and arbitration to help parents who remain in high conflict following separation and divorce. Using the enhanced critical incident technique (ECIT), eight PCs from the British Columbia Parenting Coordinator Roster Society (BCPCRS) were interviewed. The results covered a wide range of aspects of parenting coordination including PCs process for resolving conflict, and the context and dynamics in which PCs conduct their work. This is the first study on parenting coordination in British Columbia; the findings contribute to a greater understanding of the role for both professionals and the public.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Pedagogical practice in mainstream university literature courses with generation 1.5 and international ESL participants
Title:
Contributor:
Nathan Kielstra (author), William Acton (thesis supervisor), Brian Teaman (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), James Stalker (external examiner)
Abstract:
The following mixed-methods study explored the pedagogical practices of mainstream instructors in literature classes with NNS participants at a university in British Columbia. The inclusion of NNS students in these courses presents challenges due to various educational differences as compared with NS peers. This often necessitates changes in the teaching practices of instructors who might have little experience or training in the instruction of NNS students. Participants included three instructors, 33 NS students and 17 NNS students. Results indicated that each instructor employed different types of instruction in their class, including practices implemented specifically for their NNS learners which appeared dependent on experience or the number of NNS participants. Learner perception of these practices varied, with international ESL, Generation 1.5, and NS students all exhibiting preferences unique to their groups. This suggests that university instructors are active in making pedagogical adjustments in classrooms inclusive of students with diverse language abilities.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2011
Peer influence and non-suicidal self-injury in adolescence : exploring the role of co-rumination
Title:
Contributor:
Sarah Lloyd (author), Joan Kimball (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Jennifer Muehlenkamp (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between co-rumination and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a community sample of adolescents. Analysis of the data from 92 adolescent self-injurers, 51 female and 41 male, indicated that there was a significant, positive correlation of small effect size between adolescents’ level of co-rumination and their frequency of self-injury in the past year. When genders were examined separately, this positive correlation of small effect size remained significant solely for male participants. Contrary to expectations, co-rumination failed to moderate the relationship between depression and NSSI frequency, and stressful life events failed to moderate the relationship between co-rumination and NSSI frequency. Results from further post-hoc analyses and related research on peer socialization suggest possible reasons for these results and future research avenues. The strengths, contributions, and clinical implications of this study are also discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Phonology of Mosiye
Title:
Contributor:
Erika Harlow (author), Roderick Casali (thesis supervisor), Keith Snider (second reader), Andreas Joswig (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis is a description of the phonology of Mositacha, a Lowland East Cushitic language of the Afro-Asiatic family, based on original field research. Mositacha is spoken by 6,000 people who live in the North Omo Zone of the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region in Ethiopia. Very little has been written on Mositacha. With the exception of Wondwosen‘s recent grammar (2015), which identifies the consonant and vowel phonemes, notes consonant gemination and vowel length, and briefly comments on tone, there has been no systematic study on the Mositatcha phonology. This thesis offers a more comprehensive study on the phonology of Mositacha. It examines consonant and vowel phonemes, syllable structure, phonotactics, phonological processes and tone. Of particular interest are marginal consonant phonemes which may be attributed to ongoing language shift, phonemic vowel length, consonant sequences and gemination, and a description of pitch patterns in words in isolation.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
A phonology of Stau
Title:
Contributor:
A. Chantel Vanderveen (author), Roderic F. Casali (thesis supervisor), Keith Snider (second reader), Jamin Pelkey (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis is a description of the phonology of Stau, a Rgyalrongic language of the Tibeto-Burman family, based on original field research. Stau is spoken by approximately 23,000 people in the west of Sichuan province, China. It is an almost unstudied language. Apart from a sketch of the phonology and grammar by Huang (1991), which provides a phonetic (rather than phonemic) analysis of Stau sounds, lists attested onsets and rhymes, and discusses tone, there has been virtually no systematic study of the phonology of language. This thesis provides a more extensive study of Stau phonology, covering segmental phonology, acoustic analysis of stops and of vowels, syllable structure, phonotactics, phonological processes, and pitch phenomena. Of particular interest in this phonology are Stau’s large phonemic inventory of forty-two consonants and eight vowels, its large syllable canon, phonotactic constraints among its consonant clusters, and vowel changes in reduplication.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015

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