TWU Thesis Collection

Pages

The lived experience of men in reparative therapy
Title:
Contributor:
William Stanus (author), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor), William Dreikorn (second reader), Derrick Klaassen (second reader), Mark Yarhouse (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study is a phenomenological exploration of client voice in psychotherapy. Five men were recruited from the Thomas Aquinas Psychological Clinic while in reparative therapy for issues related to unwanted Same-Sex Attraction (SSA). Open-ended interviews were conducted by telephone and then transcribed and analyzed via a phenomenological research methodology. Thematic analysis yielded 11 themes which described these men's experiences in therapy and the impact of therapy on their lives as a whole, including domains such as work, relationships, and sense of self. Reparative therapy for these men emerged as primarily about a struggle for healing of masculine identity. Benefits included being able to build better non-sexual relationships with men, becoming more open to intimate relating to a woman, and improving their sense of themselves as men. This research has shed further light on the process of reparative therapy as it is practiced at the Aquinas Clinic.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
The lived experience of moral injury in the context of intimate partner relationships: A phenomenological exploration
Title:
Contributor:
Sara Kuburic (author), Mihaela Launeanu (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (second reader), Tennyson Samraj (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Moral injury (MI) represents a unique psychological suffering instigated by one's transgression of moral values, beliefs, and expectations. MI has a serious negative impact on the psychological, existential, behavioural, and relational aspects of an individual's life. At its core, MI shakes and sometimes shatters one's sense of self, perception of humanity, and overall worldview, bringing into question fundamental values of the human existence. Thus far, research studies on MI have focused almost exclusively on investigating MI within the military context, and no study has yet investigated the lived experience of MI. The present study aimed to examine the lived experience of MI in the context of intimate partner relationships. To this end, adult participants who self-identified as having experienced moral injury due to emotional abuse and/or infidelity within their intimate partner relationships were interviewed using hermeneutic phenomenology as research method. Through the phenomenological analysis of the participants' lived experience, six core thematic meanings of MI emerged: (1) self-estrangement, (2) transgressions and discord, (3) sudden awareness, (4) lostness and sorrow, (5) will to change, and (6) the aftermath. Phenomenological writing further elaborated these thematic meanings in an effort to uncover the phenomenon of MI in the context of intimate partner relationships. The findings of this study uncovered the phenomenon of MI as a process of unraveling, becoming and transforming through suffering. The theoretical contributions and clinical implications of this study are discussed in terms of emphasizing the transformative potential of moral injury experienced in relational context. Moreover, this study revealed the importance of self and self-estrangement in the experience of MI, in addition to other key components of the phenomenon (i.e., awareness and agency).
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
The lived experiences of romantic relationships following child loss
Title:
Contributor:
Erin Buhr (author), Derrick Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Briana N. Goff (second reader), Paige Toller (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study examined the impact a child’s death had on bereaved parent’s relationships with their significant other utilizing phenomenology. The research question was “what was the experience of the relationship with your significant other following the loss of your child?” Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants. Themes included: The relationship changed after the child’s death; Communication was important to the relationship dynamic; Grieving differences existed and impacted the relationship; Specific behaviours were identified that had the potential to facilitate or harm; Individual grief impacted the relationship; Couples’ utilized additional emotional support outside the relationship; Sex decreased. The themes were discussed within the context of the larger bereavement literature which included grieving differences, continuing bonds, and trauma models for couples. Themes were also discussed with regard for how to provide informed counselling interventions for bereaved parents, such as addressing issues that may arise because of grieving differences.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Living Well with Long Term Type 1 Diabetes
Title:
Contributor:
Donna Epp (author), Barbara Astle (second reader), Betty Jean Tucker (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
Although many studies have explored the experience of the person with Type 1 Diabetes, most examine the experience of the child, adolescent, or the person in transition to adulthood. Few studies focus on the person living long term with Type 1 Diabetes. This study explored the facilitators and barriers to living well with Type 1 Diabetes for the long term. Four themes were identified: accommodating and battling the disease, the convenience and constraint of technology and treatment, self-reliance and reliance on others, and external and personal knowledge. Implications for the health care team include: recognize the person is the expert on their diabetes and develop a relationship of collegiality and problem solving; as the context of a person’s life affects their diabetes management, have conversations about life, beyond just diabetes control; and screen for, learn about, and be aware of ways to address diabetes distress.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
The Marketed Image of Nursing to Prospective Students of Canadian Baccalaureate Nursing Programs
Title:
Contributor:
Heather Elliott (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Joan Boyce (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This qualitative descriptive study examined and compared the online marketing materials of 91 baccalaureate nursing programs in Canada. It explored the prevalent physical and affective characteristics of nursing as marketed to prospective nursing students in five different regions of Canada (Eastern, Northern, Central, Prairie, and Western). The study examined Canadian nursing program websites for their emphasis on (1) descriptions of the symbos, roles and goals of nursing; (2) the character, characteristics and qualifications of nurses; (3) the human populations and physical environments wherein nurses work; (4) the bahaviours and work of nurses; (5) the selection criteria of nursing students; (6) approaches to nursing education, including the foci of curriculum; and (7) representations of commitment by nursing students and professional nurses. The study found that the Canadian image of nursing as marketed on baccalaureate websites varies according to region, with marked differences noted between online marketing materials of Francophone and anglophone program websites. The study findings raise questions about the "honesty" (congruence) of marketing images, and highlight the lack of "commitment" and "persistence" as attitudes and behaviours necessary for nursing practice in Canada. This study has implications for prospective students of nursing, nursing educators, nursing program developers, nursing recruiters, and governing nursing organizations and associations.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2011
Maturity Matters: How Ego Development Helps Chinese-Canadian Biculturals Flourish
Title:
Contributor:
Katherine Halvorson (author), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor), Mihaela Launeanu (second reader), Jeffery Yen (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explores bicultural identity integration (BII) processes of adult Chinese- Canadians. Research has indicated that BII is generally associated with higher levels of psychological well-being in immigrants. During their bicultural integration, immigrants undergo a significant process of personal development as they mature and become more capable in their new cultural communities. Connections among processes of psychosocial maturity (Loevinger’s ego development), well-being and bicultural identity provide the central focus for this investigation. All questionnaires in this investigation were presented in full bilingual format with both English and Chinese translations for all questions. A moderation analysis examined ways ego development may shape the relations between bicultural identity integration and psychological well-being. Using self-report instruments, data were collected online from a sample of 104 Chinese-Canadian bicultural adults. Results revealed that an overall model incorporating bicultural identity integration, ego development, and a moderation effect significantly predicted psychological well-being, explaining 26% of the variance of psychological well-being for our Chinese-Canadian bicultural sample. Examination of several features of moderation patterns revealed a modest moderation trend involving the blendedness & compartmentalization dimension of BII, p = .053, ΔR2 = .03, in explaining well-being. Although not statistically significant, the trend offers substantive guidance for future research. The bilingual presentation of items provided an environment to simultaneously evoke both cultural frames for participants, as demonstrated in language use patterns and participant comments. This pattern of results suggests that future research is warranted to further explore processes of bicultural integration development of Chinese-Canadian biculturals.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Memories of Balaam: Translatability of a Religious Specialist in Ancient Israel
Title:
Contributor:
Ryan D. Schroeder (author), Craig Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Scholars have employed the biblical Balaam traditions both in the defense of and in opposition to Jan Assmann’s assertion that early Israel rejected cross-cultural religious translatability. The Hebrew Bible’s diverse portrayals of Balaam have long stimulated scholarly, literary-critical analysis. Also, the Deir ʿAlla inscription provides an intriguing extra-biblical glimpse of this enigmatic character. In this study, I discern how these early depictions of Balaam reflect socially shaped and shared memories of Balaam as a foreign religious specialist who participated in Israel’s past. I argue that early memories of Balaam suggest his warm reception among Yhwh worshipping Israelites in spite of his foreign status. However, later guardians of Israel’s written traditions came to remember and write about Balaam as a diviner whose role in Israel’s past primarily served to demonstrate the dangers of non-Israelites and their abominable religious practices.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
The Messiah and Eschatology in the Psalms of Solomon
Title:
Contributor:
Scott Reynolds (author), na na (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The central purpose of this thesis is to read the Psalms of Solomon as a literary and theological whole while considering the particular historical and theological milieu in which they were written. My reading of the Psalms of Solomon will demonstrate that, in these poems, the Messiah is expected to be a Davidic monarch who will restore the righteous to their appropriate position under the rule of YHWH with a decisive victory that will include the ingathering of the exiles in the penultimate period of history and an everlasting theocratic peace. I will further demonstrate that the writers of these psalms came to this conclusion through a careful rereading of their scriptural traditions based on their current historical circumstances. Connections will be drawn between this understanding of the Messiah’s eschatological role and the role of messianic figures in the Dead Sea Scrolls as well as messianic interpretations in the Septuagint.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Moral Motivation: A Survey of Attempts to Understand the Motivational Qualities of Moral Judgments
Title:
Contributor:
David E. Hill (author), Myron Penner (thesis supervisor), Phillip Wiebe (second reader), Bob Doede (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Moral judgments and moral action cannot be separated. Whether realist, anti-realist or hybrid, all agree that when a moral judgment is made, motivation to act on that judgment follows. Uncovering the nature and origin of this phenomenon will be invaluable to metaethical advancement, and will also help to shape people’s understanding and expectations of moral action from one another. This paper will explore and evaluate some of the best arguments anti-realists and hybrid theorists argue for, framing the metaethical debate in light of both current empirical and philosophical work. The general question for this thesis will be, “Which stream of thought provides the best account for the phenomenon of moral motivation?” More specifically, I will be arguing in the negative as to whether or not anti-realist and hybrid views successfully avoid significant weaknesses of their own in attempts to develop plausible theories.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Negation Patterns in the Kwa Language Group
Title:
Contributor:
Lauren E Schneider (author), Sean Allison (thesis supervisor), Steve Nicolle (second reader), Roderic Casali (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Keith Snider (second reader)
Abstract:
There is extensive literature written on negation but only recently have studies begun to expand outside of the scope of Indo-European languages. Linguists are finding that certain patterns thought to be cross-linguistic are largely unattested outside this most heavily studied language family. The intent of this thesis is to survey the negation strategies in a collection of Kwa (Niger-Congo) languages to contribute to the literature on negation. Commonly cited patterns such as Jespersen’s cycle (Jespersen 1917) are almost entirely unattested in Kwa. There is a consistent pattern of marking negation in Akan, Ewe, and the North Guang languages involving the use of a preverbal nasal morpheme. Interestingly three South Guang languages utilize instead a verbal prefix bÉ-. The Ga-Dangme languages stand out in their use of verbal suffixes rather than prefixes. The Ghana-Togo Mountain subgroup of the Kwa language group also does not rely on preverbal nasal negation marking.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
A new edition of Codex I (016) : the Washington manuscript of the epistles of Paul
Title:
Contributor:
Justin Soderquist (author), Kent Clarke (thesis supervisor), Thomas Wayment (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Nearly a century has passed since Henry A. Sanders first published his editio princeps of the Washington Manuscript of the Epistles of Paul (Codex I or 016). Within that time, it has received very little scholarly attention. This new edition provides a fresh, conservative transcription based on two new image sets, and identifies all differences between the new transcription and Sanders. It additionally provides comprehensive lists of variants between Codex I, the Nestle-Aland 28th, and the Robinson Pierpont editions of the Greek New Testament. The new edition also provides valuable data surrounding the manuscript’s provenance, character, scribal habits, textual affiliation, and substantive variants. Several corrections to Sanders are offered, and the new transcription shows the effects of nearly a century upon the manuscript. This work seeks both to update Sanders, and to provide valuable data which will make the text of Codex I more readily accessible for future inquiry.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
No faithful oaths : a comparison of Esau’s speech in Jubilees 37:18-23 with Achilles’ speech in Iliad 22.260-272
Title:
Contributor:
James Hamrick (author), James Scott (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Since the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the mid-twentieth century scholars have made significant progress in understanding the Book of Jubilees, yet very little work has been done exploring this composition within its broader non-Jewish Hellenistic literary and cultural context. The handful of studies that have addressed this issue show that Jubilees was conversant with Greek intellectual traditions, demonstrating the potential fruitfulness of this area of research and the need to explore it further. This thesis attempts a modest contribution to this task by examining Esau's speech to Jacob in Jubilees 37:18-23 in light of Achilles' speech to Hector in Iliad 22:260-272. This comparison reveals that Esau’s speech exhibits notable similarities to Achilles’ speech in literary setting, rhetorical purpose, rhetorical mechanism, use of imagery, syntax, vocabulary, and characterization. These similarities are best explained as the result of the author of Jubilees intentionally adopting and adapting elements of the Iliad for his own purposes.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014

Pages