TWU Thesis Collection

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Peer influence and non-suicidal self-injury in adolescence : exploring the role of co-rumination
Title:
Contributor:
Sarah Lloyd (author), Joan Kimball (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Jennifer Muehlenkamp (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between co-rumination and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a community sample of adolescents. Analysis of the data from 92 adolescent self-injurers, 51 female and 41 male, indicated that there was a significant, positive correlation of small effect size between adolescents’ level of co-rumination and their frequency of self-injury in the past year. When genders were examined separately, this positive correlation of small effect size remained significant solely for male participants. Contrary to expectations, co-rumination failed to moderate the relationship between depression and NSSI frequency, and stressful life events failed to moderate the relationship between co-rumination and NSSI frequency. Results from further post-hoc analyses and related research on peer socialization suggest possible reasons for these results and future research avenues. The strengths, contributions, and clinical implications of this study are also discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
The Perspectives of Canadian Nurse Entrepreneurs and Related Policy Implications: An Interpretive Description Study
Title:
Contributor:
Brenda L. Smith (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Sarah Stahlke Wall (second reader), Lynn Musto (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Nursing entrepreneurship presents as a viable and innovative approach for nursing practice while contributing to health system transformation. And yet, in countries such as Canada where universal health care funding has most nurses working as employees for state-funded health service providers, few nurses are self-employed. This qualitative study acquired the perspectives of eleven practicing Canadian nurse entrepreneurs from across Canada, and six Canadian nurse leaders with respect to current nursing practice, contexts, and issues that serve to inform and guide the development of national and provincial/territorial policies that support nursing entrepreneurship. Three categorical themes were identified: Going alone versus going along; Resistance outside of convention; and, Nursing entrepreneurship: Outcomes and opportunities. The overall findings highlight a resistance-resilience dialectic for nurse entrepreneurs, the outcome of which sees them advancing nursing practice and health system reform. Meso and macro level policy recommendations that aim to support nursing enterprise within Canada are discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Phonology of Mosiye
Title:
Contributor:
Erika Harlow (author), Roderick Casali (thesis supervisor), Keith Snider (second reader), Andreas Joswig (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis is a description of the phonology of Mositacha, a Lowland East Cushitic language of the Afro-Asiatic family, based on original field research. Mositacha is spoken by 6,000 people who live in the North Omo Zone of the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region in Ethiopia. Very little has been written on Mositacha. With the exception of Wondwosen‘s recent grammar (2015), which identifies the consonant and vowel phonemes, notes consonant gemination and vowel length, and briefly comments on tone, there has been no systematic study on the Mositatcha phonology. This thesis offers a more comprehensive study on the phonology of Mositacha. It examines consonant and vowel phonemes, syllable structure, phonotactics, phonological processes and tone. Of particular interest are marginal consonant phonemes which may be attributed to ongoing language shift, phonemic vowel length, consonant sequences and gemination, and a description of pitch patterns in words in isolation.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
A phonology of Stau
Title:
Contributor:
A. Chantel Vanderveen (author), Roderic F. Casali (thesis supervisor), Keith Snider (second reader), Jamin Pelkey (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis is a description of the phonology of Stau, a Rgyalrongic language of the Tibeto-Burman family, based on original field research. Stau is spoken by approximately 23,000 people in the west of Sichuan province, China. It is an almost unstudied language. Apart from a sketch of the phonology and grammar by Huang (1991), which provides a phonetic (rather than phonemic) analysis of Stau sounds, lists attested onsets and rhymes, and discusses tone, there has been virtually no systematic study of the phonology of language. This thesis provides a more extensive study of Stau phonology, covering segmental phonology, acoustic analysis of stops and of vowels, syllable structure, phonotactics, phonological processes, and pitch phenomena. Of particular interest in this phonology are Stau’s large phonemic inventory of forty-two consonants and eight vowels, its large syllable canon, phonotactic constraints among its consonant clusters, and vowel changes in reduplication.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
The post-expectant period : how expectations and embodiment shape the postpartum period for first-time Canadian fathers
Title:
Contributor:
Susan L. Pater (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Reina Van Lagen (second reader), Wendy Hall (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In this qualitative study, ten first-time Canadian fathers were interviewed from six cities in two provinces about their perceptions and experiences during the postpartum period. All study participants recently had their first child born to them. The continued bearing of expectations into the period following the birth of their child affirmed the overarching theme of the postpartum period as the post-expectant period. The three categorical themes related expectations about fatherhood to the infant, gendered norms, and healthcare services. The findings highlight the potential impact of healthcare and government policies to support fathers during their transition into fatherhood. It is of the essence that nurses' understanding of paternal experiences throughout the transition to fatherhood be expanded to provide appropriate services and to better meet the needs of fathers and, in turn, their families.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Potential sectarian variants in Psalm 119 of 11Q5 : a further investigation in response to Eugene Ulrich’s “The absence of sectarian variants in the Dead Sea Scrolls”
Title:
Contributor:
Jeffrey Spence (author), Martin Abegg (thesis supervisor), Peter Flint (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This essay examines the portions of 11Q5 (Great Psalms Scroll) that correspond to Psalm 119 and compares them as variants from MT (as representative of Proto-MT, discussed within) with the intention to test Eugene Ulrich's absolute statement that there are no "sectarian variants" in the biblical Dead Sea Scrolls. It employs a comprehensive survey of the variants in its search for theologically motivated variation, which it then tests against theological themes as found in 1QS and more general theological themes of broader Second Temple Judaism. As a secondary endeavor, it more clearly defines Ulrich's apparent understanding of what the term "sectarian variant" signifies and seeks to draw attention to the practice of assuming against sectarian variation until proven otherwise; it argues for a more balanced approach of "no designation without scholarly evidence." The essay includes extensive charts of the variants, divided into "variant types" for ease of reference.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Predicting the length of stay in older adults undergoing transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation
Title:
Contributor:
Sharon Rong Wang (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Sandra Lauck (thesis supervisor), Jennifer Gibson (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The predictors of the length of hospital stay (LOS) in older adults undergoing the transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA TAVI) remained under-explored. The objective of this study was to identify patient’s individual characteristics, TA TAVI procedural details, and relevant post-procedure factors that were predictive of LOS after TA TAVI. A retrospective review of 128 consecutive medical charts was conducted, and 62 potential predictor variables were analyzed by utilizing various statistical analyses. This study identified five individual characteristics, procedural details, and post-procedure factors that were statistically significantly associated with the LOS following TA TAVI. Its findings may alert nurses to heed the implications of these predictors in TA TAVI patients and initiate nursing interventions to reduce the risk of prolonged LOS related complications. Future studies are recommended to confirm these findings and the effects of other potential predictors.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Professional Development of Nursing Leaders: A Case Study of Canadian Nurses
Title:
Contributor:
Laura J. Colley (author), Maggie Theron (thesis supervisor), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Sonia Udod (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Nursing leadership is important in every domain of nursing. However, nursing leadership development is not well understood or documented. This study addresses this gap by turning to an overlooked source of leadership knowledge: presidents of the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA). These leaders have influenced nursing practice, changed the perception of nursing, and improved healthcare. Yet, little is known about them. This study aims to inspire and inform current and future nurses by exploring leadership journeys of CNA presidents. Seven nurses who have held the title of president of the CNA were interviewed. Six themes were identified: Relentless Incrementalism; Embracing Opportunities, , A Service Mindset, Taking the Long View, Enduring Heartbreak, and Taking a Seat at the Table. The findings of this study not only provide insight into the practice wisdom of those who have gone before, they also provide a resource for the development of nursing leaders today.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Promoting functional status of older adults in the emergency department : exploring nurses’ perceptions of care
Title:
Contributor:
Mary Ostrowski (author), Faith Richardson (thesis supervisor), Landa Terblanche (second reader), Corina Vogt (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Older adults presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) are at risk for functional decline. Registered Nurses (RNs) in the ED are challenged to optimize the functional status of older adults in a dynamic practice environment with conflicting priorities and system demands. This interpretive descriptive qualitative study used elements of action research and visual methods to explore ED nurses’ perceptions of care on promoting the functional status of older adults in the ED. Eleven purposefully selected ED RNs completed a questionnaire and participated in up to three focus groups. Study results suggest that improving the ED nurses’ ability to promote the functional status of older adults in the ED can improve the wellbeing of older adults and ease nurses’ moral distress. From a cost and quality of life perspective, the vulnerability of older adults toward functional decline and the vulnerability of ED nurses toward moral distress must be recognized and addressed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Registered Nurses Providing Dignity: Caring for Older Persons Living in Residential Care
Title:
Contributor:
Glenda J. King (author), Barbara Astle (thesis supervisor), Wendy Duggleby (second reader), Gina Gaspard (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Older persons comprise an intricate component of society and, managing their care needs in a manner that demonstrates dignity, is an important element of nursing care. This qualitative study interviewed 11 registered nurses working in a residential care facility, to explore how they provided dignity to older persons. Data analysis revealed three themes: 1) Supporting Dignity included the sub-themes; caring for the whole person, respecting, encouraging independence and being remembered, 2) Dignity Care incorporated; doing, value-giving care, building relationships and balancing and negotiating and, Structural Context for Dignity comprised; time, nurses' voice, physical setting and barriers created by policy/procedures. The findings demonstrated a unique linkage of self-identity and legacy to supporting dignity for older persons, the influence of structural contexts on nurses' ability to provide dignity care to older persons in residential care and, an association to respect.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Relational dimensions of perinatal bereavement : an actionproject investigation of joint grieving in bereaved parents
Title:
Contributor:
Scott Gallagher (author), Derrick Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Landa Terblanche (second reader), José Domene (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explored the relational dimensions of perinatal grieving. Three perinatally bereaved couples each participated in one interview, as well as a follow-up member check interview. The research question for this study was, “how do bereaved parents grieve jointly following perinatal loss?” Data were collected using the qualitative action-project method, and participants were asked how they grieved together for their deceased baby. Joint grieving processes were identified at couples’ initial interviews, and then, following preliminary analyses, were presented back to the couples during the member check interviews for confirmation and alteration. The data analysis followed the protocols set forth in the action-project and instrumental case study methods, combining all data collected from both sets of interviews. Within-case analyses revealed intentional frameworks for each of the couples joint grieving projects, including: (1) Marveling at God’s presence in the midst of loss and the endurance of grace, respect, and togetherness in marriage, (2) Finding each other in the midst of grieving differences to celebrate and honour the sanctity of life, and (3) Coming back into life to find joy and new responsibilities while continuing to mark and honour the existence of the deceased. Joint grieving involved several commonalities between the couples, including re-learning the uniqueness of one another through grieving, interspersing grief within ongoing faith careers, using the safety of the relationship to express painful thoughts and feelings, oscillations between hope and pain, and the ongoing nature of grieving rituals as joint actions. The findings of this study support the application of broader theoretical models of bereavement to the unique context of perinatal loss, as well as emerging constructivist models of perinatal bereavement. The findings also demonstrate the relevance of relational dimensions of grieving for future empirical and clinical developments in the area of perinatal bereavement.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Relevance Theory and Proverbs: Exploring Context through Explicatures and Implicatures
Title:
Contributor:
Nicholas T Toews (author), Steve Nicolle (thesis supervisor), Sean Allison (second reader), Peter Unseth (third reader), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Relevance Theory (Sperber & Wilson 1986/1995) is a theory of communication which states that the human brain is geared towards processing relevant stimuli for little effort. While proponents of Relevance Theory have endeavored to explain various linguistic phenomena such as metaphor, irony, sarcasm, and idioms, there has been little work done on the proverb. The current thesis fills in this gap within Relevance Theory by applying Relevance-Theoretic principles to the interpretation of proverbs in context. This study explains how proverb meaning carries both a base meaning as well as an implicated meaning in context, with the use of Relevance Theory’s explicatures and implicatures. In addition, this thesis makes use of ad hoc concept formation (Wilson & Carston 2007) to account for meaning modulation and contrasts the analysis of proverbs under Relevance Theory with Vega-Moreno’s (2003) analysis of idioms under Relevance Theory.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019

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