TWU Thesis Collection

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Non-spatial setting in white Hmong
Title:
Contributor:
Nathan M. White (author), Sean Allison (thesis supervisor), Kenneth Gregersen (second reader), Ken Manson (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Dixon (2010a,b, 2012) presents an excellent introduction to a framework for documenting a language's grammar. One portion of this is Non-spatial Setting, i.e., the grammatical marking of time, aspect, and other material. The aim of this thesis is to apply this portion of Dixon's framework to White Hmong (Hmong-Mien, Laos). The thesis first looks at typologically similar languages from the region, considers the nature of grammaticalization, and then discusses the Non-spatial Setting system of White Hmong itself. It is found that White Hmong possesses a system that includes Lexical Time Words, positive and negative Irrealis intertwined with a system of Modality, Degree of Certainty markers, and a group of Phase of Activity-marking verbs. There are five Completion morphemes--three Perfect and two Imperfect--and two Completion-marking strategies. Finally, there is one Speed morpheme that marks slowness. Some implications for Non-spatial Setting in general are also briefly discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Northern Psalms in Southern Contexts: Defining a Historical Setting for the Psalms of Asaph
Title:
Contributor:
Spencer J Elliott (author), Craig C Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The psalms of Asaph (50, 73-83) present an intriguing problem for their interpreters. Though these psalms show every sign of being used in the temple at Jerusalem, they contain a ponderous amount of traditions, geographic references, and names that would be more appropriate in Israel’s northern kingdom. The haphazard geographic and tradition-history provenance of these psalms is best reconciled by assuming a fundamental mixture between northern and southern material in the growing and cosmopolitan city of pre-exilic Jerusalem, beginning in the time of Hezekiah. As northern psalmists moved to Jerusalem after the conquests of the Assyrian empire in the late 8th c. BCE, they brought their traditions of worship and assimilated these traditions within the liturgies of Jerusalem’s temple. These psalms illumine how northern Israelites accommodated to their new Jerusalemite setting after 722 BCE, and how their psalms reflect their experience of forced displacement.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Northern rural nurses’ self-perceived competence in addressing the spiritual needs of patients with life-limiting conditions by using a palliative approach
Title:
Contributor:
Ibolya Agoston (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Jean- François Desbiens (second reader), Barbara Pesut (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Spirituality has been long recognized as part of holistic nursing care. This study examined the degree of self-perceived competence of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and care-aides in addressing spiritual needs of patients with advancing life-limiting conditions who are in need of a palliative approach. The sample included 189 providers, at twenty rural hospitals, residential and homecare settings in Northern British Columbia, who participated in a provincial survey with the Initiative for a Palliative Approach in Nursing: Education and Leadership (iPANEL). Descriptive statistical analyses and multivariate linear regression were conducted to compare RNs, LPNs and CAs and to examine factors that explain variation in their self-perceived competence to addressing spiritual needs. RNs in homecare had the highest levels of self-perceived competence among care providers across settings. The statistically significant predictors were: self-perceived levels of knowledge and education on spiritual needs, nursing education levels, being older, English as primary language.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Novice nurses’ experiences providing palliative care for children and their families
Title:
Contributor:
Elizabeth Cernigoy (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Gwen Rempel (second reader), Heather Meyeroff (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The role of registered nurses is complex and involves nursing care from the beginning to the end-of-life. Currently, Canadian undergraduate nursing programs rarely focus on specialty training but rather on entry-to-practice competencies. The purpose of this project was to explore the experiences of novice nurses providing palliative care for children and their families.The findings from interviews with eight novice nurses revealed that the caring they provided was influenced by who the nurses were, the knowledge they possessed, the context of their workplaces and societal beliefs about children dying, and the families to whom care was given. The relational practice abilities of the nurses proved to be an overarching theme as the ability to connect with a child and family was foundational. Novice nurses offer important perspectives about pediatric end-of-life care and provide insight into areas of strength and continual improvement for the ultimate benefit of children and their families.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Nurse Manager Perspectives about Internationally Educated Nurses (IENs) and Hiring Practices in Long-Term Care
Title:
Contributor:
Katrina M Haynes (author), Barbara Astle (thesis supervisor), Margery Hawkins (second reader), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Internationally Educated Nurses (IENs) are an integral part of Canada’s workforce. In a qualitative study, seven Nurse Managers from long-term care facilities in British Columbia were interviewed about their perceptions and experiences with IENs, and how these influenced their hiring practices. Three themes emerged: Acknowledging the Complexities, Finding the “Right Fit”, and Navigating Differences. Conclusions were that Nurse Managers: 1) Compared IENs to newly graduated nurses, 2) Generally preferred hiring Canadian educated nurses over IENs, 3) Perceived IENs as being ready to practice, but failed to acknowledge their nursing education and experience, 4) Perceived IENs as a homogenous group, 5) Preferred hiring IENs with positive attitudes, clear communication skills, and Canadian nursing experience, 6) Were unware of current licensing guidelines, 7) Used no established hiring guidelines, and 8) Possessed a positive ‘gut feeling” about new hires. Recommendations for nursing education, management, and research are made based on these conclusions.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Nurses Perceptions of Supervisory Leadership for Patient Safety: A Narrative Synthesis
Title:
Contributor:
Kathleen E.A. Samoil (author), Faith Richardson (second reader), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (second reader), Kris Gustavson (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
This thesis addressed whether trends could be found in studies that used questionnaires to ascertain nurses’ perceptions of supervisory leadership for safety in the context of patient safety culture. Thirty-five studies were analyzed. They used the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, Safety Climate Survey, Survey on Safety in Nursing Homes, RN4CAST. One study used qualitative interviews. The result was that patient safety culture assessments should be interpreted relative to the context in which they are conducted. Results are not generalizable and trends among the studies could not be identified. Participants’ culture, workplace culture and geographic location were found to be important influences. It was also found to be important to reassess at intervals and examine the results in the context of the workplace at the time of each assessment. There is benefit to combining qualitative and quantitative methods to assess patient safety culture.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2017
Nurses’ perception of workaround use
Title:
Contributor:
Casandra E. Jordan (author), Richard Sawatzky (thesis supervisor), Darlaine Jantzen (second reader), Lynn Musto (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Workarounds are prevalent within the healthcare community, particularly in frontline nursing care. It has only been recent that the study of workarounds and their impact has emerged within healthcare literature. This interpretive description study was designed to investigate how nurses perceive workarounds, what they think about before, during and after the process, and what patient, environmental, and personal factors they consider during a workaround. Seven participants, including both Registered Nurses and Licenced Practical Nurses participated in interviews. Five themes were identified through qualitative analysis of the interviews highlighting emotional, mental and the professional impact of workarounds for nurses and their patients. The Implications to nursing practice include the value of nurses in creating frontline procedures, the responsibility of nurses to provide, the potential of current workarounds to produce practice based evidence and the need for nurses to be aware of the emotional and mental health risks of workaround use.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
On moral objectivity : can there be objective moral evaluation without invoking the existence of “queer” ontological properties?
Title:
Contributor:
Esther J. Devries (author), Phillip Wiebe (thesis supervisor), Robert Doede (second reader), Myron Penner (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
J.L Mackie, defender of the moral-error-theory, argues that to claim the existence of objective moral facts implies moral properties with inbuilt "to-be-pursuedness" - they would have to be intrinsically motivational. Since we do not know of the existence of any such properties, he argues that moral facts are "queer" things. I examine the positions of moral realists and anti-realists pointing out that it seems that one must either assert the existence of "queer" moral properties, or reject the truth functionality of categorical imperatives. After exploring the thought of Hilary Putnam and Emmanuel Levinas, I suggest an alternative explanation of the human moral experience that is free of "queer" moral properties. In this way, I believe to offer a more adequate explanation of human morality that defeats the false dilemma created by Mackie.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Parenting Coordination: Helping and Hindering Factors in the Resolution of Conflict in the Child's Best Interest.
Title:
Contributor:
Marianne C. Cottingham (author), Marvin J. McDonald (thesis supervisor), Bart Begalka (second reader), Jeff Chang (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the factors in parenting coordination that helped or hindered the successful resolution of family conflict in the child’s best interests. The role of the parenting coordinator (PC) is a hybrid role that combines psychology, conflict resolution, and arbitration to help parents who remain in high conflict following separation and divorce. Using the enhanced critical incident technique (ECIT), eight PCs from the British Columbia Parenting Coordinator Roster Society (BCPCRS) were interviewed. The results covered a wide range of aspects of parenting coordination including PCs process for resolving conflict, and the context and dynamics in which PCs conduct their work. This is the first study on parenting coordination in British Columbia; the findings contribute to a greater understanding of the role for both professionals and the public.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Patient Volunteers' Perspectives on Fostering Patient-Centred Care Through Interprofessional Education
Title:
Contributor:
Tracy R. Barra-Navratil (author), Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham (thesis supervisor), Landa Terblanche (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Betty Jean Tucker (third reader)
Abstract:
This qualitative study explores Patient Voices Network (PVN) volunteers’ perspectives on patient-centred care (PCC) through their involvement in Fraser Health’s Acute Care Orientation (ACO), an Interprofessional Education (IPE) setting. Four objectives were addressed including their meaning of PCC and what has shaped this meaning, what motivates the PVN volunteers to participate and share their experiences in ACO, how they view their role in IPE in ACO, and their recommendations regarding PCC and IPE. The participants’ illness experiences shaped their roles as both patient and patient volunteer and were the catalyst that propelled them to volunteer in the health care system. Factors that led to or hindered the patient voice were identified by participants and included health care provider behaviours, partnership, information sharing, communication, and system influences that promote patient-centred cultures. Characteristics of the participants contributed to both the role of the patient and the patient volunteer and their illness experiences.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Pedagogical practice in mainstream university literature courses with generation 1.5 and international ESL participants
Title:
Contributor:
Nathan Kielstra (author), William Acton (thesis supervisor), Brian Teaman (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), James Stalker (external examiner)
Abstract:
The following mixed-methods study explored the pedagogical practices of mainstream instructors in literature classes with NNS participants at a university in British Columbia. The inclusion of NNS students in these courses presents challenges due to various educational differences as compared with NS peers. This often necessitates changes in the teaching practices of instructors who might have little experience or training in the instruction of NNS students. Participants included three instructors, 33 NS students and 17 NNS students. Results indicated that each instructor employed different types of instruction in their class, including practices implemented specifically for their NNS learners which appeared dependent on experience or the number of NNS participants. Learner perception of these practices varied, with international ESL, Generation 1.5, and NS students all exhibiting preferences unique to their groups. This suggests that university instructors are active in making pedagogical adjustments in classrooms inclusive of students with diverse language abilities.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2011
Peer influence and non-suicidal self-injury in adolescence : exploring the role of co-rumination
Title:
Contributor:
Sarah Lloyd (author), Joan Kimball (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Jennifer Muehlenkamp (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between co-rumination and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a community sample of adolescents. Analysis of the data from 92 adolescent self-injurers, 51 female and 41 male, indicated that there was a significant, positive correlation of small effect size between adolescents’ level of co-rumination and their frequency of self-injury in the past year. When genders were examined separately, this positive correlation of small effect size remained significant solely for male participants. Contrary to expectations, co-rumination failed to moderate the relationship between depression and NSSI frequency, and stressful life events failed to moderate the relationship between co-rumination and NSSI frequency. Results from further post-hoc analyses and related research on peer socialization suggest possible reasons for these results and future research avenues. The strengths, contributions, and clinical implications of this study are also discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014

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