TWU Thesis Collection

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Reconstructing the text of the church : the “canonical text” and the goal of New Testament textual criticism
Title:
Contributor:
David R. Herbison (author), Craig Allert (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Kent Clarke (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
Amidst recent doubts about the feasibility of achieving New Testament textual criticism’s traditional goal of establishing the “original text” of the New Testament, Brevard Childs proposed that text critics should go about reconstructing the “canonical text” instead. However, concepts of “canon” have generally been limited to discussions of which books were included or excluded from a list of authoritative writings, not necessarily the specific textual readings within those writings. This thesis considers whether there is historical evidence to support the existence of such a “canonical text” of the New Testament, and whether modern text critics and exegetes should prefer this textform to more traditional reconstructions. This study concludes that there is little evidence to support the existence of a lost “canonical text” of the New Testament, and that even if one assumes the existence of such a text, there are good reasons for continuing to prefer more traditional reconstructions.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Registered Nurses Providing Dignity: Caring for Older Persons Living in Residential Care
Title:
Contributor:
Glenda J. King (author), Barbara Astle (thesis supervisor), Wendy Duggleby (second reader), Gina Gaspard (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Older persons comprise an intricate component of society and, managing their care needs in a manner that demonstrates dignity, is an important element of nursing care. This qualitative study interviewed 11 registered nurses working in a residential care facility, to explore how they provided dignity to older persons. Data analysis revealed three themes: 1) Supporting Dignity included the sub-themes; caring for the whole person, respecting, encouraging independence and being remembered, 2) Dignity Care incorporated; doing, value-giving care, building relationships and balancing and negotiating and, Structural Context for Dignity comprised; time, nurses' voice, physical setting and barriers created by policy/procedures. The findings demonstrated a unique linkage of self-identity and legacy to supporting dignity for older persons, the influence of structural contexts on nurses' ability to provide dignity care to older persons in residential care and, an association to respect.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
Relational dimensions of perinatal bereavement : an actionproject investigation of joint grieving in bereaved parents
Title:
Contributor:
Scott Gallagher (author), Derrick Klaassen (thesis supervisor), Landa Terblanche (second reader), José Domene (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explored the relational dimensions of perinatal grieving. Three perinatally bereaved couples each participated in one interview, as well as a follow-up member check interview. The research question for this study was, “how do bereaved parents grieve jointly following perinatal loss?” Data were collected using the qualitative action-project method, and participants were asked how they grieved together for their deceased baby. Joint grieving processes were identified at couples’ initial interviews, and then, following preliminary analyses, were presented back to the couples during the member check interviews for confirmation and alteration. The data analysis followed the protocols set forth in the action-project and instrumental case study methods, combining all data collected from both sets of interviews. Within-case analyses revealed intentional frameworks for each of the couples joint grieving projects, including: (1) Marveling at God’s presence in the midst of loss and the endurance of grace, respect, and togetherness in marriage, (2) Finding each other in the midst of grieving differences to celebrate and honour the sanctity of life, and (3) Coming back into life to find joy and new responsibilities while continuing to mark and honour the existence of the deceased. Joint grieving involved several commonalities between the couples, including re-learning the uniqueness of one another through grieving, interspersing grief within ongoing faith careers, using the safety of the relationship to express painful thoughts and feelings, oscillations between hope and pain, and the ongoing nature of grieving rituals as joint actions. The findings of this study support the application of broader theoretical models of bereavement to the unique context of perinatal loss, as well as emerging constructivist models of perinatal bereavement. The findings also demonstrate the relevance of relational dimensions of grieving for future empirical and clinical developments in the area of perinatal bereavement.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
Relevance Theory and Proverbs: Exploring Context through Explicatures and Implicatures
Title:
Contributor:
Nicholas T Toews (author), Steve Nicolle (thesis supervisor), Sean Allison (second reader), Peter Unseth (third reader), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Relevance Theory (Sperber & Wilson 1986/1995) is a theory of communication which states that the human brain is geared towards processing relevant stimuli for little effort. While proponents of Relevance Theory have endeavored to explain various linguistic phenomena such as metaphor, irony, sarcasm, and idioms, there has been little work done on the proverb. The current thesis fills in this gap within Relevance Theory by applying Relevance-Theoretic principles to the interpretation of proverbs in context. This study explains how proverb meaning carries both a base meaning as well as an implicated meaning in context, with the use of Relevance Theory’s explicatures and implicatures. In addition, this thesis makes use of ad hoc concept formation (Wilson & Carston 2007) to account for meaning modulation and contrasts the analysis of proverbs under Relevance Theory with Vega-Moreno’s (2003) analysis of idioms under Relevance Theory.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
Ripples of Betrayal: A Voice-Centred Relational Inquiry into Acquaintance Sexual Assault
Title:
Contributor:
Danielle B Palmer (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Mihaela Launeanu (second reader), Allyson Jule (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
By adopting a relational ontology, the present study challenges traditional approaches to psychological theory, research and practice. This complementary lens was used to explore women’s experiences of harm and healing in the context of acquaintance sexual assault. Six women participated in interviews using sandtrays, and the Listening Guide (Brown & Gilligan, 1992) was used to analyze transcripts. Voices of harm constricted participants’ experiences of being connected to themselves, others and the world, and consisted of denial, confusion, judgment, isolation and separation. Voices of healing emerged as expansive processes, identified as acknowledgment, knowing, acceptance, accompaniment and empowerment. These findings broaden current understandings of sexual assault, trauma and betrayal, and better equip counsellors, social supports, communities and cultures, to dismantle relational processes that stagnate survivors and promote those that foster growth.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
The Role of Metaphor in the Treatment of Dissociative Identity Disorder: Listening to the Multiple Voices of Shared Experience
Title:
Contributor:
Katelyn A. Fister (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Richard Bradshaw (second reader), Lara Ragpot (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In this study, the Listening Guide (Brown & Gilligan, 1992) was used to explore the therapeutic application of metaphor in the treatment of dissociative identity disorder (DID) from the perspective of both client and therapist. Through analysis of the interviews, eight voices were identified. These voices are organized into two overarching categories: 1) voices of trauma and dissociation, and 2) voices of healing and integration. Relationships were observed among the various voices of dissociation, as well as between the voices of dissociation and those of trauma and healing. These relationships reveal natural links between clients’ metaphors of trauma, dissociation, and healing. The clients’ core metaphors of dissociation – Hope’s beehive metaphor and ‘Reace’s mansion metaphor – illustrate the complex relationships that exist among these metaphorical constructs. The metaphors represented the individuals’ subjective experiences of DID and were used as the main organizers of the healing process across all three phases of treatment.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2019
A Sanctuary in Time: Exploring Genesis 1’s Memory of Creation
Title:
Contributor:
Kyle R.L. Parsons (author), Craig C. Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Since the days of Wellhausen, pentateuchal scholarship has essentially agreed that Gen 1 and Gen 2 are from two distinct sources. Furthermore, they agree that Gen 1 was added in front of Gen 2 at a relatively late period during the Pentateuch's compositional history. Moving beyond these agreements, this thesis asks why Gen 1, and its cultural memory of creation, was added in front of Gen 2? In other words, what motivated a later group to come along and add Gen 1? As such, this thesis argues that Gen 1 was intentionally added in order to primarily elevate the Sabbath to a position and status equal to the Temple/Tabernacle. In mnemonic terms, then, Gen 1 is a countermemory that resulted in a shift away from sacred space toward sacred time. A mnemonic shift from the sanctuary in Jerusalem to a sanctuary in time.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Science and knowledge : a post-modern approach to empiricism
Title:
Contributor:
Clayton Lee Swan (author), Phillip Wiebe (thesis supervisor), Myron Penner (second reader), Robert Doede (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Science has become the standard for determining truth and producing knowledge. This has happened alongside the diminishing value of traditions and common sense as sources of knowledge. That is, science has become the benchmark for knowledge at the expense of other possible means. The fact that science has taken such a prominent position regarding knowledge is interesting when one considers the weaknesses of the realist position in the philosophy of science. By `realism' I mean the belief that scientific theories are true, or at least approximately true. I begin by discussing arguments both for and against scientific realism, I conclude that science is a non-realist enterprise and that while useful in helping us understand the world, calling the theories of science `true' is not a safe risk. Finally, since science is the standard for knowledge, I present a theory on the implications of this view for knowledge in general.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2015
Sea Change: Nursing in Bella Bella, 1901-1925
Title:
Contributor:
Sarah Colleen Cook (author), Sonya Grypma (thesis supervisor), Geertje Boschma (second reader), Laurie Meijer Drees (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
In the early 1900s, the Heiltsuk village of Bella Bella (Wáglísla) in Northwest British Columbia boasted a new Methodist mission hospital and a small Training School for Nurses. This study explores the largely unknown history of missionary nursing in Bella Bella between 1901 and 1925, built around the private documents of Doris Nichols, who began her nursing training there in 1921. This study critically examines the experiences of early nurse missionaries—students and graduates —who lived, learned, worked, and worshiped as a part of the Methodist medical mission in Bella Bella and to the surrounding area. As a social history, this study reflects on those experiences through the lenses of gender, age, class, race, region, and religion. This exploration concludes that Doris Nichols’ rare experience was interconnected with—and an extension of—the profound changes that occurred for the Heiltsuk, the Methodist missions, nursing education, and Doris herself.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2018
Seeking the Body Electric: The Role of Embodied Affective Experience in the Process of Recovery From Anorexia Nervosa
Title:
Contributor:
Chelsea D. Beyer (author), Mihaela Launeanu (thesis supervisor), Janelle Kwee (second reader), Faith Auton-Cuff (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Anorexia nervosa (AN) is presently defined by restriction of energy intake, low body weight, fear of gaining weight, and disturbances in body image (American Psychological Association, 2013). Absent from the current framework of AN is the acknowledgement of embodied and lived experience. Alternatively, the Developmental Theory of Embodiment (DTE), founded on Merleau-Ponty’s conceptualization of embodiment, proposed that AN develops from complex interactions between the embodied female self and the sociocultural context in which it is situated (Piran & Teall, 2012). Extending from the framework of the DTE, the purpose of the study was to explore the role of embodied and affective experience in women with AN through the process of recovery using body-centered poetic discourse as a method of inquiry. Six women diagnosed with AN reflected on three time points of their recovery journey: at the worst of the eating disorder, in recovery, and towards unified body-self. Thematic analysis of poetic discourse resulted in the identification of eleven embodiment and three affective themes. Moreover, three body-self patterns emerged from the AN recovery process: bifurcated, recovered, and unified body-self. With recovery from AN, poetic discourse displayed a pattern of shifting from negative embodied experience to positive embodied experience. The change in the affective experience was intertwined with that in the embodied experience, likewise shifting from negative or absent to positive. Findings illustrated recovery from AN as parallel to the restoration of embodied lived experience. The clinical and societal implications of these findings are discussed in terms of reforming conceptualization and prevention of AN.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
Self-concept and Juvenile Diabetes in Young Adulthood
Title:
Contributor:
Lisa Steenburgh (author), Joan Kimball (thesis supervisor), Marvin McDonald (thesis supervisor), Derrick Klaassen (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This study explored self-concept and living with juvenile diabetes in young adulthood. Eight young adults ages 19-29 who self-identified as having juvenile diabetes participated in one to two-hour semi-structured interviews. Interviews were analyzed using the descriptive phenomenological approach, as outlined by Giorgi and Giorgi (2003a). Being shaped but not defined by juvenile diabetes emerged as the essence of the young adults' experiences. Self-concept was shaped by diabetes in three main ways: (1) becoming more responsible, mature and resilient, (2) planning ahead and thinking critically, and (3) gaining empathy. Underlying several themes was the choice participants made to stay positive and maintain hope. They separated symptoms from self, and as much as possible did not let diabetes limit them. Paradoxically, limitations helped them develop skills that put them ahead in other areas of their lives. Findings are particularly relevant for mental health professionals working with young adults living with chronic illness.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2014
A semiotic perspective on the positive transfer of L1 structure in second language instruction
Title:
Contributor:
Rachael Caunce (author), William Acton (thesis supervisor), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Language educators are re-examining the benefits of positive transfer. As the usage of the term language interference is misleading, the benefits of positive transfer have not been fully recognized until recently. When considered from a semiotic perspective with reference to language acquisition, neurolinguistic and applied linguistic theories, language interference can be perceived as a symptom of equivocal signs. It is proposed that student's learner errors may be attributed to a phenomenon called `semiotic confusion', which is a specific state of disorientation caused by a misinterpretation of signs. Consequently, language interference is redefined as a symptom of `semiotic confusion'. A hypothetical model, the Personal Semiotic Cultural Consciousness/ Semiotic Cultural Consciousness (PSCC/SCC), which is composed of two competing states of consciousness that correspond with synthetic and analytic brain functioning provides instructors with insights about the importance of activating their students' internal and external semiotic cultural consciousness through somatosensory signs such as colour.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013

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