TWU Thesis Collection

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Women’s Perspectives on What Helped and Hindered Building Shame Resilience During an Adolescent Eating Disorder
Title:
Contributor:
Hilary A. Evans (author), Kathryn Weaver (third reader), Krista D. Socholotiuk (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Mihaela S. Launeanu (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
Eating disorders (EDs) in adolescence are serious mental health disorders that commonly have noteworthy medical and mental health comorbidities (Fitzsimmons-Craft, Karam, Wilfley, 2018). Shame has been found to be a significant factor associated with EDs (Burney & Irwin, 2000; Goss & Allan, 2009; Waller, Ohanian, Meyer & Osman, 2000), yet no studies have explored what helps and hinders building shame resilience during adolescence from the perspective of the adult who lived through it. This retrospective qualitative study used the enhanced critical incident technique (Butterfield, Borgen, Maglio, & Amundson, 2009), and the sample of this study included women who received an ED diagnosis between the age of 11 and 21 (N = 10). Data analysis revealed 13 helping categories, 15 hindering categories, and 9 wish list items.
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Publication Year:
2020
A World of Their Own Making: Student Life at Southern Women’s Colleges, 1800-1865
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Contributor:
Jessie VanderHeide (author), Robynne Healey (thesis supervisor), Brian Gobbett (second reader), Amrita C. Myers (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Since the 1980s, the majority of historical scholarship on southern women’s education has concentrated on seeking answers to the question “to what extent was antebellum southern women’s education an oppressive or liberating force?” While keenly noting that the emergence of women’s higher education in the early nineteenth-century South did not necessarily entail advancement for women,1 much of this existing scholarship, because it is focused on analysing institutional records, looks primarily at college curricula and practices to answer questions regarding the value of education; accordingly, this scholarship concludes that, while women’s higher education was new to the early nineteenth-century South, it did not offer southern women anything “new” in terms of social position and therefore was not ultimately a liberating force. While the existing scholarship is useful because it points out the engendered nature of southern women’s education, an exploration of students’ recollections of their college experiences challenges the conclusion that women’s colleges offered women nothing new and were ultimately oppressive forces. For while women’s college education was engendered in such a way that it aimed to reinforce pre-existing ideas concerning southern womanhood this does not necessarily mean that the ideals of women’s education matched its actual out-workings. Indeed, assuming that the “ideal” matched the “real” ignores female students’ responses to their engendered educations. Paying attention to students’ recollections of their college experiences reveals that the college experience actually granted young women the opportunity to shape their own female-controlled world in the midst of living in an intensely patriarchal society. Perhaps surprisingly, though, the world that these students shaped through their cultivation of academic, social, and religious cultures was one in which they not only challenged the gender ideals of southern society and thereby formed new identities as women, but one in which they also (somewhat paradoxically) upheld a hierarchical structure that undermined any type of sisterhood or collective redefinition of southern womanhood and, at times, even reinforced more traditional gender conventions. Thus, a study of southern women’s colleges that privileges the agency of female students not only provides a more complete picture of women’s education, but highlights the complexity of southern women’s identities and thereby contributes to wider discussions within southern and women’s history.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2012
Writings of an ancient poet : a theological composition of Aurelius Prudentius Clemens’ soteriology as depicted in his Liber Cathemerinon
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Contributor:
Erika M. McAuley (author), Archie Spencer (thesis supervisor), Bruce Guenther (second reader), Christopher Morrissey (external examiner), Trinity Western University GSTS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
By his poetic declarations concerning Jesus Christ, Prudentius appeals to some as a flagship for fourth-century Nicene theology. This thesis investigates the poet’s concept of salvation to determine its congruity with Nicaea’s underlying soteriology. To that end, Athanasius’ Against the Gentiles-On the Incarnation and Prudentius’ Liber Cathemerinon are read in juxtaposition, drawing out and comparing theological themes. Prudentius exhibits an inherent fixation on the problem of sin and its effect on salvation. This diminishes the significance and hope offered by the Incarnation. Yet, Athanasius purports that Nicaea’s Christological proclamations are founded on God’s saving action in Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection. Therefore, while the Christological confessions of Nicaea appear to prefigure the theology of Prudentius in his pastiche, Liber Cathemerinon, a closer analysis reveals that his conception of salvation is inconsistent with the underlying soteriological impetus of Nicene theology.
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Publication Year:
2013
Written and spoken register differences in Baghdadi colloquial Arabic dramatic discourse
Title:
Contributor:
Hazel Twele (author), Richard Gravina (second reader), Steve Nicolle (third reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution), Sean Allison (thesis supervisor)
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to describe linguistic differences between written scripts and the oral performances of those scripts in Baghdadi Colloquial Arabic dramatic discourse. The data involves 10 Biblical narratives written in a dramatized format with the intent of being performed. The scriptwriters’ goal was to create texts that were as similar to natural speech as possible. However, in spite of this goal, certain changes occurred throughout the stories when performed by mother tongue Baghdadi Arabic speakers. Although this study records all deletions, additions and substitutions in each of the ten stories, it will highlight three types of changes: the deletion of the connective wa ‘and’, the addition of repeated words and phrases, and diglossically motivated substitutions. These changes represent involvement strategies employed by the actors to accommodate the increased need for textual and interpersonal cohesion in the speaker-hearer dimension when changing the mode from writing to speaking.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
YHWH as Gardener in the Old Testament with special reference to Psalm 104
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Contributor:
Jeehoon B. Kim (author), Craig Broyles (thesis supervisor), Dirk Büchner (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
The aim of the present study is to investigate Psalm 104 as a whole and to determine its biblical-theological contribution to Israelite thinking of creation. Its methods are comparative-historical, semantic, literary, and biblical theological. I argue that the psalmist uses not only images that are reminiscent of the sun-god and storm-god of the ancient Near East but also images that reflect an ancient garden or park. Thus, the thesis of this study is that Psalm 104 portrays creation as a garden and YHWH as the royal gardener who creates it and oversees its care. As ancient gardens were built and maintained in order to reflect creation with a diversity of plants and animals, the provision of water, and ecological order, the psalm portrays creation by using images that allude to an ancient garden.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
YHWH, the ineffable name : avoidance, alternations and circumventions in the non-biblical manuscripts at Qumran
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Contributor:
Joëlle Alhadef-Lake (author), Martin G. Abegg, Jr. (thesis supervisor), Dorothy Peters (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
During the period of the writing of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Tetragrammaton (YHWH) was so sacred that it had become an ineffable name. This thesis studies alternations in the usage of the Tetragrammaton in non-biblical manuscripts at Qumran through an analysis of scriptural quotations from the Torah to the Nevi'im in the Dead Sea Scrolls citing the Tetragrammaton. Thirty-three distinctive divine name alternations were identified. Additionally, a list of alternation types and of scrolls featuring alternations in Qumran were compiled. Distinctive groups of scrolls were identified at Qumran: some featured the Tetragrammaton, with or without alternations, and some circumvented it completely. Our study focuses on the avoidance of the Tetragrammaton, on alternations in square script, and on writing traditions: El, Tetrapuncta and paleo-Hebrew. Two applications were then investigated: the use of alternations in divine names in order to determine the scrolls' origins and the distribution of names in paleo-Hebrew in these scrolls.
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Publication Year:
2014
Youth as Mindfulness Trainers: Educators' Views
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Contributor:
Jerlyn J. Chan (author), Marvin McDonald (second reader), Robert Lees (second reader), Christine Slavik (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis project explored educators’ views of a mindfulness program that was delivered to elementary school students by high school students. This youth-led approach to delivering mental health literacy was evaluated as part of a pilot project that intended to connect both older and younger students and pass down mindfulness education. The method, the Enhanced Critical Incident Technique, was selected and involved conducting in-person interviews with each of the participants. The participants consisted of six educators, who offered diverse perspectives by their first-hand knowledge and experience of the program or familiarity with the program’s development. Participants included the elementary school and high school teachers, the elementary school principal and community agency staff. The findings of this study showed a consensus whereby educators viewed the program favourably and believed it to be valuable to their students and their larger community. The youth-led approach was shown to demonstrate the youth’s capacity to act as positive role models and lead the mindfulness training. The feasibility of the program was supported with reference to key partnerships and its possible application to additional community settings. An enthusiasm and keen interest to continue and expand the program were also captured in the results. The educators’ views of this program, the Youth-led Mindfulness Program (YLMP), were investigated to answer the following research question: What are educators’ views about what helps and hinders school-based mental health literacy programs that are delivered by youth as mindfulness trainers?
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Publication Year:
2018
‘Torn Apart’: Involuntary Separation and the Search for Connection
Title:
Contributor:
Willow C. Glasier (author), Mihaela Launeanu (thesis supervisor), Janelle Kwee (second reader), Nancy Sidell (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Placing a loved one in care does not relieve informal caregivers’ physical and emotional stresses, yet the experience of caregivers during the long process of separation has not been fully explored, especially in Canada. This study sought to identify the social processes of involuntary separation for caregiving spouses. Participants were 17 spouse-caregivers who had been involuntarily separated for an average of 20 months. All participants lived in Southern Alberta. Data were comprised of 12 individual interviews and one focus group. Using Charmaz’s (2006) model of grounded theory, this study found that the basic social process of spouse-caregiver involuntary separation was connecting, which had three distinct stages: 1) Initial news and coping, 2) Adjusting to new situation, and 3) Moving forward. There were four additional categories: 1) Adjustment to separation, 2) Significant Helping Roles, 3) Family, and 4) Social world. Movement through the three stages was influenced by reciprocal connections.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2016
“Indeed, He is coming with the clouds” A study of Revelation 1:7-8 as the multivalent thematic statement of the Apocalypse
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Contributor:
Mark A. Haukaas (author), James M. Scott (thesis supervisor), Kent D. Clarke (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
Although many scholars regard Rev 1:7, 1:8, or 1:7-8 as thematic for Revelation, they have not substantiated their claim. Revelation 1:7-8, which highlights the cosmic parousia of Jesus Christ, is the multivalent thematic statement of the Apocalypse. Revelation 1:7-8 features a prominent allusion to Dan 7:13, which serves to unlock the multilayered meaning of the Apocalypse. To highlight Rev 1:7-8, the author uses such literary devices as poetry, inclusio, inclusive language, and liturgical dialogue. The author also uses chain-link interlock to connect Rev 1:7-8 with Rev 1:9-20, which is thematic. The author further links Rev 1:7-8 and Revelation 4-5 and establishes Daniel 7 as an allusion that controls these two central chapters. The author uses key words throughout Revelation 6-22 that resonate with Rev 1:7-8. With Rev 1:7-8 as the axis, the author expands the meaning of Christ's cosmic parousia in all its dimensions and ramifications.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
“Nothing about us without us!” Youth-led solutions to improve high school completion rates
Title:
Contributor:
Fred Chou (author), Janelle Kwee (thesis supervisor), Robert Lees (thesis supervisor), Marla Buchanan (external examiner), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) study collaborated with six students from alternate education to inquire about the experiences of vulnerable youth--students who have disengaged from mainstream education. Utilizing the Enhanced Critical Incident Technique, youth researchers asked their peers: what helped and hindered their retention and success in mainstream and alternate education? Youth researchers engaged in authentic participation and took part in the iterative phases of YPAR--critical reflection and social action. Their involvement empowered them to advocate for their peers by disseminating the results and recommendations to key stakeholders within the community. Youth researchers conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. Overall, the findings show that relationships with staff and peers, flexibility, psychosocial and academic supports, and personal circumstances are vital in helping vulnerable students succeed in school. Engagement in YPAR provided insight on how to work with vulnerable youth in a manner that promotes agency and social change.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013
“You will be like the gods” : the conceptualization of deity in the Hebrew Bible in cognitive perspective
Title:
Contributor:
Daniel O. McClellan (author), Craig Broyles (thesis supervisor), Martin Abegg (second reader), Trinity Western University SGS (Degree granting institution)
Abstract:
This thesis has two primary goals: (1) to analyze the countours and extent of the generic category of deity in the Hebrew Bible, and (2) propose a semantic base for the term. It begins with a description of the fields associated with cognitive theory, and particularly cognitive linguistics. Chapter 2 examines the cognitive origins of notions of deity and discusses how this heritage is reflected within the biblical texts. The third chapter examines the conceptualization of Israel’s prototypical deity, YHWH, beginning from the earliest divine profiles detectable within the text. In Chapter 4 the discussion returns to the generic notion of deity, highlighting references within the biblical text to deities other than YHWH. The conclusion synthesizes the different sections of the thesis, sketching the origins and development of the Hebrew Bible’s representation of both prototypical and non-prototypical notions of deity. Implications for further research are then briefly discussed.
Discipline/Stream:
Publication Year:
2013

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